The Commons House of Assembly in South Carolina - 1692 to 1729

150 settlers with Governor William Sayle first landed at Port Royal, then proceeded to the Ashley River and established the town of Charles Town at Albemarle Point in April of 1670. To date, this Author has not found any information on the Charles Town assemblies prior to 1692.

In 1692, the Lords Proprietors of Carolina directed Governor Philip Ludwell to summon the first body which can be identified as the Commons House of Assembly. This body was divided equally into four distinct counties - Albemarle, Berkeley, Colleton, and Craven. Each county was to send five representatives, but Albemarle was too far from Charles Town and therefore never sent any delegates to this Assembly - they maintained their own Assembly until the American Revolution.

To initially fill the vacancies, Berkeley County and Colleton County each sent seven delegates and Craven County sent six delegates. The number of delegates increased as the population increased.

These three counties continued to serve as election districts until 1716, when the Assembly authorized the existing parishes (created in 1706 and 1712) to serve as the new election districts. However, the Lords Proprietors disallowed these new election districts as well as other key legislation, and these vetos helped ignite the rebellion against Proprietary rule in 1719. The election act of 1716 was passed once again in 1719 and the Proprietors once again disallowed it, but their veto was ignored by the colonists. It was replaced in 1721 with minor amendments and the creation of more new parishes, and this became the election law for the remainder of the colonial period in South Carolina.

Click on the Assembly Number below for a listing of all known Assembly delegates at that given Assembly. You can also click on the available journals to view or download. If more are found, they will be added here.

Beginning in 1836, South Carolina published a ten-volume compilation of all known laws enacted since the earliest times. Click on the Statutes at Large below to view or download those created by the Commons House of Assembly. More will be found in the Royal Period (see bottom of this page).

The Commons House of Assembly Under the Lords Proprietors

Assembly
Number

Year(s) Met

Journals Available

Statutes at Large

Comments

1st

1692-1694

1692
1693

Volume I
Early Documents

 

 

 

Volume II
Laws Enacted
1682 to 1716
See Map #1. May have met once more in 1695.

2nd

1695

1695
See Map #2.

3rd

1696-1697

1696-January
1696-November
1697
See Map #2.

4th

1698-1699

1698
See Map #2.

5th

1700-1702

1700
1701-February
1701-August
See Map #2.

6th

1702-1703

1702
See Map #2.

7th

1703-1705

1705-1706
See Map #2.

8th

1706-1707

1706-1707
See Map #2.

9th

1707

-
See Map #2. Records incomplete for this Assembly.

10th

1707-1708

1707-June
1707-October
See Map #2.

11th

1708-1709

-
See Map #2.

12th

1710-1711

-
See Map #2.

13th

1711-1712

-
See Map #2.

14th

1713-1715

-
See Map #2.

15th

1716-1717

-
See Map #2.

16th

1717-1720

-

See Below
See Map #3.

17th

1720-1721

-
See Map #3.

The Commons House of Assembly Under the Crown*

Assembly
Number

Year(s) Met

Journals Available

Statutes at Large

Comments

1st

1721-1724

1724

Volume III
Laws Enacted
1716 to 1752
See Map #3.

2nd

1725-1727

1724-1725
1725-1726
1726-1727
See Map #4.

3rd

1728

-
See Map #4.

4th

1728

-
See Map #4.

5th

1728

-
See Map #4.

6th

1729

-
See Map #4.

* Click Here for the Commons House of Assembly of South Carolina after 1729.

 


© 2016 - J.D. Lewis - PO Box 1188 - Little River, SC 29566 - All Rights Reserved