Carolina Under the Lords Proprietors' Rule

17th House of Burgesses - 1710-1712

In 1710, Edward Hyde was appointed as Deputy Governor of the province, but he was to receive his commission from the governor in Charles Town, Edward Tynte, who had died before he arrived, and he had no evidence of his right except private letters from the Lords Proprietors.

From the summer of 1710 until May 9, 1712, Edward Hyde led as President of the Executive Council. On May 9, 1712, he received his official commission from the Lords Proprietors, dated January 24, 1711/12, and he took the oath of office on this date as the first "full" Governor of the colony of North Carolina, no longer subservient to the governor in South Carolina.

President Hyde called an Executive Council, opened the courts which had been closed during the recent disturbances, and in the summer of 1711 summoned a General Assembly. This General Assembly, which had been elected under influences favorable to the establishment, passed Acts requiring that the oaths should be administered and lawful government maintained. It also provided for the recovery of the rents and fees which Thomas Cary had collected and of the deeds of land to the Swiss Palatines which were in his possession. All of Thomas Cary's Acts were declared illegal and void, and he and John Porter were ordered to be taken into custody.

Upon receipt of his official commission and instructions from the Lords Proprietors, Governor Edward Hyde dissolved the General Assembly on May 10, 1712.

Sadly, Governor Edward Hyde died at his home on September 8, 1712 of Yellow Fever.

Records of his Executive Council exist from June of 1711 to August of 1712. However, no records exist from the General Assembly during the tenure of President/Governor Edward Hyde.

However, on July 25, 1711, Virginia Governor Alexander Spotswood sent a letter to the Board of Trade and enclosed an address by President Edward Hyde, his Executive Council, and the House of Burgesses, including the Acts passed by the General Assembly in 1711.

Click Here to read this account from 1711, which includes the names of all known representatives, and a complete record of two Acts passed during this General Assembly.

House of Burgesses - 1711
(See Below for 1712)

Election District

Delegate

Archdale Precinct

Lyonell Reading

--

Chowan Precinct

John Blount

William Bray

Frederick Jones

Thomas Lee

Edward Smithwick

Currituck Precinct

William Read

William Swann*

Thomas Vandorumlen

--

--

Pamtecough Precinct

--

--

Pasquotank Precinct

Francis De La Mere

Thomas Relfe

Richard Stamp

Robert Wallace

--

Perquimans Precinct

James Coles

Thomas Long

--

--

--

Wickham Precinct

Richard Jasper

John Jordan
*William Swann was elected as Speaker of the House in 1711. The following men were elected to this House of Burgesses, but this Author cannot ascertain which precinct they represented: Edward Boyner, Leonard Laftin, John Muncref, and Richard Terry.


In February of 1711/12, President Edward Hyde, with his Executive Council, and members of the House of Burgesses addressed Virginia Governor Alexander Spotswood. Click Here to read that address and see who signed the document.

House of Burgesses - 1712

Election District

Delegate

Beaufort Precinct
(was Pamtecough Precinct)

Thomas Harding

--

Chowan Precinct

John Byrd

John Hardy

Thomas Luton

Edward Moseley

Edward Smithwick

Craven Precinct
(was Archdale Precinct)

--

--

Currituck Precinct

William Luffman

Thomas Taylor

--

--

--

Hyde Precinct
(was Wickham Precinct)

--

--

Pasquotank Precinct

Alexander Spence

--

--

--

--

Perquimans Precinct

Thomas Snoden*

John Stepney

--

 --

--
* Thomas Snoden (aka Thomas Snowden) was elected Speaker of the House in 1712. The following men were elected to this House of Burgesses, but this Author cannot ascertain which precinct they represented: William Linton, John Rhett.
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