North Carolina - From Statehood to 1800

North Carolina State Senate

1789

This General Assembly met in Fayetteville from November 2nd to December 22nd in 1789. The first three days of the Senate Journal are missing for this session.

During 1788, the NC Legislature created Iredell County and Tennessee County. These two counties sent their first delegates to the NC General Assembly in 1789.

It was this General Assembly that ceded the lands west of the Appalachian Mountains to the U.S. Government as part of North Carolinas national debt. It was also this General Assembly that elected the first two U.S. Senators from North Carolina and established a process for the People to elect five members to the U.S. House of Representatives in early 1790. Finally, it was also this General Assembly that established the University of North Carolina and appropriated funds for the initial buildings.

County

Delegate

Anson

Thomas Wade (1) / Lewis Lanier

Beaufort

William Brown

Bertie

John Johnston

Bladen

Thomas Brown

Brunswick

Vacant / Unknown

Burke

Charles McDowell

Camden

Isaac Gregory

Carteret

John Easton

Caswell

Robert Payne

Chatham

George Lucas

Chowan

Charles Johnson**

Craven

Vacant / Unknown

Cumberland

Alexander McAllister

Currituck

Vacant / Unknown

Davidson (TN)

William Donaldson

Dobbs

Richard Caswell, Sr.* / John Herritage

Duplin

James Gillespie (2)

Edgecombe

Etheldred Gray (died) (3)

Franklin

Henry Hill

Gates

Joseph Riddick

Granville

Samuel Clay

Greene (TN)

John Sevier (4)

Guilford

William Gowdy

Halifax

John Baptiste Ashe***

Hawkins (TN)

Thomas Amis

Hertford

Thomas Wynns

Hyde

John Eborne

Iredell

John Nesbitt

Johnston

Arthur Bryan

Jones

Frederick Hargett

Lincoln

Joseph Dickson

Martin

Nathan Mayo

Mecklenburg

Joseph Graham

Montgomery

William Kendall

Moore

Thomas Overton

Nash 

Hardy Griffin

New Hanover

Timothy Bloodworth

Northampton

John M. Binford

Onslow

David Yates

Orange

Joseph Hodge

Pasquotank

Joseph Keaton

Perquimans

Joshua Skinner

Pitt

William Blount

Randolph

John Arnold

Richmond

Robert Webb

Robeson

John Willis

Rockingham 

James Galloway

Rowan

George Henry Barrier
(aka George H. Berger, Barringer)

Rutherford

Richard Singleton

Sampson

Richard Clinton

Sullivan (TN)

Joseph Martin

Sumner (TN)

Daniel Smith

Surry

Joseph Winston

Tennessee (TN)

John Montgomery

Tyrrell 

Jeremiah Frazier

Wake

Joel Lane

Warren

John Macon

Washington (TN)

Landon Carter (4)

Wayne

Richard McKinnie

Wilkes

William Lenoir

* Richard Caswell was elected Speaker of the Senate. Sherwood Haywood was appointed Clerk. Caswell died on November 10, 1789, and a new election was ordered. John Herritage was elected and he took his seat on November 30th.

** Charles Johnson was elected Speaker of the Senate upon the death of Richard Caswell.

*** On November 25th, the Senate elected John Baptiste Ashe as Speaker Pro Tempore since Charles Johnson was very ill. Charles Johnson recovered and returned as Speaker on November 30th.

(1) On November 13th, the Senate determined that Thomas Wade had not accounted for all Public Taxes as Sheriff of Anson County before being elected to the Senate. They deemed him ineligible and ordered a new election. Lewis Lanier was elected to take his place and he took his seat on November 30th.
(2) On December 18th, the General Assembly elected James Gillespie to the Council of State.
(3) The Senate noted on November 24th that Etheldred Gray had died during the previous night. His seat remained vacant.

(4) The Senate Journal noted in one place that John Sevier was elected Senator from Washington County. The Journal named all of the Senators above, but did not state which county every man represented. The records of the simultaneous Constitutional Convention of 1789, also held in Fayetteville at the same time, noted that John Sevier represented Greene County and that Landon Carter represented Washington County. Therefore, this Author has them as shown above - with acknowledgement that this might be reversed. Beats me which is 100% accurate.

Similarly, the Senate Journal named a Mr. Donaldson and a Mr. Montgomery, but did not provide which county they represented. This Author again used the records of the Constitutional Convention of 1788 to ascertain that William Donaldson was from Davidson County and the records of the Constitutional Convention of 1789 that John Montgomery was from Tennessee County. One must be aware - that these conclusions might be wrong. Oh well. Best I can do, warts and all.

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