North Carolina Education - Halifax County

Year County Established

County Webpage Herein

County Seat Webpage Herein

1758

Halifax County

Halifax
This Author has not found the legislative Acts and Resolutions from 1791 to 1816. If they are ever located then they will be appropriately included herein.
On November 20, 1819, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish Enfield Academy at the town of Enfield in Halifax County. Eight (8) trustees were named in the Act.
On December 24, 1820, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish Farmwell Grove Academy in Halifax County. Thirteen (13) trustees were named in the Act.
Also on December 24, 1820, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the trustees of Farmwell Grove Academy in Halifax County to raise up to $1,500 via a lottery.
On December 26, 1821, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish Halifax Academy in the town of Halifax in Halifax County. Six (6) trustees were named in the Act. This Act was amended on December 31, 1824; see directly below.
On December 31, 1824, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the earlier Act of December 26, 1821 (above) by appointing seven (7) new trustees for the said academy. If vacancies arise, the citizens of the town of Halifax may elect replacement trustees.
On February 12, 1827, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the commissioners of the town of Halifax to sell the Halifax Academy lots and to repay subscribers in proportion to their contributions.
On January 14, 1847, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate Eglantine Academy in Halifax County. Twelve (12) trustees were named in the Act.
On February 21, 1867, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the trustees of Vine Hill Academy in Halifax County to sell off part of their lands.
On February 16, 1874, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Halifax Educational Association of Halifax County. Seven (7) trustees were named in the Act, and they were to establish an institution for learning.
On March 7, 1883, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Central Institute for Young Ladies in the town of Littleton in Halifax County near the Warren/Halifax county line. Eleven (11) corporators and thirteen (13) temporary officers/directors were named in the Act, and the school was authorized assets up to $350,000. On March 4, 1887 (below), the school was renamed to Littleton Female College.

In 1883, the Central Institute was established in the town of Littleton in Halifax County, North Carolina.

Littleton College, a defunct all-female institution affiliated with the Methodist Church, was located in the town of Littleton. Privately opened in January of 1882 as Central Institute, the school was formally chartered by the General Assembly the following month when Littleton civic leaders formed a corporation to oversee the school “for the intellectual, moral, and religious development and training of young ladies.”

Reverend James Manley Rhodes of Four Oaks, a Methodist minister and graduate of Trinity College, was appointed the first principal. Although he resigned in 1887 to take over operations at nearby Henderson Female College, Rhodes returned in 1889 after purchasing the college property from the original stockholders. Rhodes then set about developing further the school’s buildings and facilities. In 1888 the charter had been amended to change the name to Littleton Female College.

The school operated a two year program offering courses including chemistry, physics, stenography, languages, and history. In 1890, annual tuition, including room and board, was $70 per pupil. By 1908, nearly 25 faculty members attended to 284 students from nearly every southern state, as well as Oklahoma and one young lady from Cuba. In 1912, the “female” was dropped from the title, and the school became Littleton College.

Seven years later, at perhaps the height of the school’s popularity, tragedy struck. On the night of January 22, 1919, a fire consumed the majority of the school’s buildings and, although no lives were lost, damages exceeded $50,000. President Rhodes, then advanced in age, did not have the abilities or resources to raise the needed money to rebuild and the college closed.

The above write-up was provided by the North Carolina Highway Marker program. Click Here to read and to see the sources.

On March 4, 1887, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the earlier Act of March 7, 1883 to incorporate the Central Institute for Young Ladies (above) and changed the name to Littleton Female College in the town of Littleton in Halifax County.
On March 5, 1889, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the qualified voters in the town of Littleton in Halifax County and Warrent County to decide whether to levy a special tax to fund public schools in the town of Littleton. Eight (8) trustees were named in the Act. This Act was amended on February 26, 1897; see below.
On February 26, 1897, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the earlier Act of March 5, 1889 relative to public schools in the town of Littleton in Halifax County. Five (5) trustees were named for the white school, and five (5) trustees were named for the colored school.
On March 9, 1897, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate Scotland Neck Training and Industrial School in the town of Scotland Neck in Halifax County. Fourteen (14) trustees were named in the Act.
On March 6, 1899, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Neuse River Baptist Institute in the town of Sheldon in Halifax County. Eleven (11) trustees were named in the Act, and the school was authorized assets up to $25,000.
In the Biennial Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction for the scholastic years of 1899 and 1900, it was reported that there were four (4) private schools in Halifax County:

Private School

Town/Village

Principal

No. of Students

Roanoke Institute

Weldon

J.A. Jones

--

Vine Hill Male Academy

Scotland Neck

D.M. Prince

--

Vine Hill Female Academy

Scotland Neck

Miss Lena Smith

--

Littleton School

Littleton

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