North Carolina Education - Sampson County

Year County Established

County Webpage Herein

County Seat Webpage Herein

1784

Sampson County

Clinton
This Author has not found the legislative Acts and Resolutions from 1791 to 1816. If they are ever located then they will be appropriately included herein. 
On December 26, 1821, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish Clinton Academy in the town of Clinton in Sampson County. Fourteen (14) trustees were named in the Act. This Act was amended on February 12, 1827; see below.
On January 4, 1826, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate Line Academy in Sampson County. Thirteen (13) trustees were named in the Act.
On February 12, 1827, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the earlier Act of December 26, 1821 (above) concerning Clinton Academy in the town of Clinton in Sampson County. Three (3) trustees make a quorum to transact academy business.
On January 7, 1828, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate Holly Grove Academy in Sampson County. Seven (7) trustees were named in the Act.
On January 10, 1835, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate Spring Vale Academy in Sampson County. Fifteen (15) trustees were named in the Act. The village of Spring Vale sprang up around the academy and received its first Post Office on February 11, 1845; the Post Office closed in 1870.
On January 27, 1851, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Clinton Female Academy in the town of Clinton in Sampson County. Four (4) commissioners were named to manage the issuance of $5,000 in capital stock. Stockholders to elect trustees.
On February 14, 1855, the North Carolina General Assembly passed a Resolution to direct the State Literary Board to loan $3,000 to the Clinton Female Institute in the town of Clinton in Sampson County, along with loans to two (2) other female schools.

In 1875, Isham Royal founded Salemburg Academy, a one-room, private educational institution for girls in Salemburg, North Carolina. Private academies such as Salemburg flourished before the widespread introduction of public schools. One of the first principals was Marion Butler, later a U.S. Senator from North Carolina. In 1914, the program reorganized as the Pineland School for Girls following receipt of a donation of $70,000 from Benjamin N. Duke, son of Washington Duke, namesake of Duke University, and a commensurate contribution from local citizens.

In 1926, the curriculum was broadened, several more buildings constructed, and the library expanded. The school became Pineland Junior College and served as a female only institution. A young men’s division, the Edwards Military Institute, was added and was named for Methodist minister Anderson Edwards, who had contributed his life savings to the construction of the military academy.

The campus prided itself on accepting and educating children of all ages, with classes ranging from kindergarten to junior college. The pupils often came from broken and single parent homes. With the addition of summer classes, many children remained on campus year round in dormitories. For the young boys, regular military training did not begin until age fourteen, but all ages were required to dress in military uniforms. In 1952, the schools had the youngest college president in the United States, W. J. Blanchard, a World War II veteran, who at the time was thirty-two (32) years old.

On July 1, 1965, the two schools merged and became Southwood College. However, by the late 1960s enrollment had decreased significantly, and the school closed its doors in 1973. That year, the North Carolina Department of Justice took over the grounds, and developed the North Carolina Justice Academy for the training of North Carolina criminal justice officers.

The above write-up (with edits) was provided by the North Carolina Highway Marker program. Click Here to read and to view their sources.

On February 17, 1885, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize certain citizens in Sampson County to use some of the county public school funds to send children to Glenwood Academy in Johnston County.
On March 7, 1887, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize certain citizens in Sampson County living near White Oak (?) to attend school in adjacent Johnston County School District No. 27.
In the Biennial Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction for the scholastic years of 1889 and 1890, it was reported that there were thirteen (13) private schools for white children and two (2) private schools for colored children in Sampson County. The private schools for white children were:

Private School

Town/Village

Principal

No. of Students

Salem High School

Huntley

George V. Baker

50

Hayne Academy

Hayne

Street Brewer

59

Clement Model School

Clement

G.I. Smith

60

Goshen High School

Hobton

John D. Ezzell

45

Mingo High School

Hawleys Store

Rev. William Bland

44

Coharie Academy

Coharie

Rev. T.M. Leary

24

Mrs. Wright's School

Coharie

Mrs. B.V. Wright

14

Clinton School

Clinton

Rev. J.W. Turner

68

Clinton Female Institute

Clinton

Miss Mary Anderson

75 females

Union Academy

Harrells Store

Isaac Fort

46

Ingold Preparatory School

Ingold

W.A. Hobbs

42

Taylor's Bridge Academy

Taylors Bridge

Thomas Sloan

46

Clinton Private School

Clinton

Miss Mary Lou Brown

23
The private schools for colored children were:

Private School

Town/Village

Principal

No. of Students

Union Educational School

Clinton

W.T. Pritchett

60

Preparatory & Normal School

Clinton

G.W. Herring

65
On March 13, 1895, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the qualified voters in the town of Clinton in Sampson County to decide whether to levy a special tax to fund graded schools in the town of Clinton. This Act was possibly repealed on March 2, 1899; see below.
Also on March 13, 1895, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to prevent the sale of wine, hard cider, or intoxicating drinks within one (1) mile of Ingold Academy in the village of Ingold in Sampson County.
On February 26, 1897, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to prohibit the sale of spirituous liquors within three (3) miles of Parkersburg Academy in the village of Parkersburg in Sampson County.
On March 2, 1899, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to repeal or amend the earlier Act of March 13, 1895 (above) concerning graded schools in the town of Clinton in Sampson County.
On March 6, 1899, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to create and estalish a new school district for white students only in Sampson County. Boundaries were defined in the Act, but the district name and number were to be decided by the county school board.
In the Biennial Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction for the scholastic years of 1899 and 1900, it was reported that there were twelve (12) private schools in Sampson County:

Private School

Town/Village

Principal

No. of Students

Clinton High School

Clinton

W.A. Hobbs

50

Westover High School

Ora

Mr. Smith

50

Oakhurst School

Chance

W.A. Harper

77

Salem High School

Salemburg

F.A. Wooton

100

Sandling High School

Clinton

L.M. Hobbs

50

Well's Chapel

Bland

W.H. Holland

60

Harrell's Store High School

Harrells Store

C.E. Howard

50

Snow Hill School

Taylors Bridge

D.B. Ray

60

Beulah High School

Clinton

Street Brewer

75

Clement High School

Clement

C.M. McIntosh

60

Turkey High School

Turkey

B.F. Grady

40

Maple Grove School

Timothy

J.M. Raga

50
 
 
 
 
 


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