North Carolina Education - Wayne County

Year County Established

County Webpage Herein

County Seat Webpage Herein

1779

Wayne County

Waynesborough,
Goldsboro
This Author has not found the legislative Acts and Resolutions from 1791 to 1816. If they are ever located then they will be appropriately included herein.
On November 17, 1818, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to Establish Wayne Academy in Wayne County. Sixteen (16) trustees were named in the Act.
On January 9, 1833, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Waynesborough Academy in the town of Waynesborough in Wayne County. Nine (9) trustees were named in the Act.
On January 16, 1847, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Everittsville Female Academy in the village of Dudley in Wayne County. Eight (8) trustees were named in the Act. The village of Dudley was renamed to Everittsville and it received its first Post Office on April 9, 1849. However, the Post Office closed permanently in 1866.
On January 27, 1849, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Macon Academy in Wayne County. Five (5) trustees were named in the Act.
On February 18, 1867, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to change the name of Wayne Female College to Goldsboro Female College in the town of Goldsboro in Wayne County.
On March 29, 1880, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the qualified voters in the town of Goldsboro in Wayne County to decide whether to levy a special tax to establish graded schools in the town of Goldsboro. This Act also addressed the same for Salisbury.
On March 5, 1881, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the qualified voters in the town of Goldsboro in Wayne County to decide whether to levy a special tax to establish graded schools in the town of Goldsboro. Seven (7) trustees for white schools were named, and seven (7) trustees for colored schools were named in the Act.
On February 27, 1883, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act in relation to the graded schools in the town of Goldsboro in Wayne County. Seven (7) new trustees were named, and they were authorized to take over the property of the former Goldsboro Female College.
On March 7, 1883, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Colored Orphan Home of Eastern North Carolina in the town of Goldsboro in Wayne County. Eleven (11) corporators were named in the Act, the home was authorized assets up to $25,000.
In the Biennial Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction for the scholastic years of 1889 and 1890, it was reported that there were three (3) private schools for white children in Wayne County:

Private School

Town/Village

Principal

No. of Students

Mount Olive High School

Mount Olive

E.E. Britton

130

Nahunta Academy

Pinkney

J.H. Moore

115

Hand School

Fremont

W.H. Hand

142
On March 3, 1891, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the trustees of the Goldsboro Graded Schools to issue up to$15,000 in bonds for thirty (30) years at six (6) per cent interest to pay for a new school building.
On February 14, 1893, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Baptist Missionary and Educational Convention of North Carolina for the Colored Race. Eleven (11) corporators were named in the Act. This organization was originally established in 1867 in the town of Goldsboro in Wayne County. It is now named the General Baptist State Convention of North Carolina.
On March 11, 1895, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to appoint a local board of trustees for the Colored Normal School in the town of Goldsboro in Wayne County. Five (5) trustees were named in the Act. This Act was repealed on February 10, 1899; see below.
On March 13, 1895, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act pertaining to the Odd Fellows' Orphan Home in the town of Goldsboro in Wayne County. Five (5) trustees were named in the Act.
On February 10, 1899, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to repeal two Acts regarding the Colored Normal School in the town of Goldsboro in Wayne County. See March 11, 1895, above.
On March 6, 1899, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to provide for the Colored Normal School in the town of Goldsboro in Wayne County. Five (5) trustees were named in the Act.
Also on March 6, 1899, the North Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the qualified voters in the town of Mount Olive in Wayne County to decide whether to levy a special tax to pay for graded schools in the town of Mount Olive. Six (6) trustees were named in the Act.
In the Biennial Report of the Superintendent of Public Instruction for the scholastic years of 1899 and 1900, it was reported that there were three (3) private schools in Wayne County:

Private School

Town/Village

Principal

No. of Students

Mount Olive High School

Mount Olive

W.L. Nicholson

40

Seven Springs Academy

Seven Springs

Miss Alice Ivey

35

Fremont Academy

Fremont

A.R. Morgan

80

Since its establishment, Mount Olive College has been sponsored by the Convention of Original Free Will Baptists. The institution was chartered in 1951 and opened in 1952 at Cragmont Assembly, the Free Will Baptist summer retreat grounds near Black Mountain, under the direction of the Reverend Lloyd Vernon. The School initially was called Mount Allen Junior College, taking its name from a mountain near Cragmont, where the retreat was held.

The Free Will Baptist Church movement began in 1727 when Paul Palmer organized a church at Chowan, North Carolina, having relocated there after serving ministries in New Jersey and Maryland. Southern churches from multiple associations organized into a General Conference by 1921 and merged with a northern conference in 1935 to form the National Association of Free Will Baptists. Members of the Original Free Will Baptists churches associated themselves with the larger organization but many in North Carolina opposed portions of the new organization and split from the National Association in 1961.

In September of 1953, the college relocated to Mount Olive, nearer the center of denominational strength in the eastern section of the state in Wayne County. Under the leadership of the Reverend David W. Hansley, plans were made to develop a junior college offering programs in arts and sciences and business. The Reverend W. Burkette Raper was elected president in the summer of 1954, and in September the college began its first year with an enrollment of twenty-two students. In 1956, the name was changed to Mount Olive Junior College and ambitious plans were launched for an enlarged campus, one which today consists of 138 acres. In 1977, the convention requested that the board of trustees work toward making the college a four-year institution and, in 1986, Mount Olive College was accredited as a four-year institution to award associate and baccalaureate degrees.

The above write-up (with edits) was provided by the North Carolina Highway Marker program. Click Here to read and to view their sources.

 
 
 
 


© 2018 - J.D. Lewis - PO Box 1188 - Little River, SC 29566 - All Rights Reserved