The American Revolution in North Carolina

The Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge

February 27, 1776


Patriot Cdr:

Col. Richard Caswell
Loyalist Cdr:

Brig. Gen. Donald MacDonald
Killed:

1
Killed:

30
Wounded:

1
Wounded:

20
Captured:

0
Captured:

850
Original County: 

New Hanover County
Present County:

Pender County

As part of the British war strategy in 1776, General William Howe instructed General Sir Henry Clinton to open a front in the American South. The prime target was Charlestown, South Carolina, and it was hoped that a show of force would rally the area’s considerable loyalist population to the cause. General Clinton’s army was to arrive by sea from Boston and join a force being sent from England, in the waters off Cape Fear, North Carolina.

However, before the plan could unfold, an important confrontation occurred outside of Wilmington, North Carolina. Royal Governor Josiah Martin had raised an army of 1,600 Crown supporters, including Scottish Highlanders and former Regulators. This army, commanded by Brigadier General Donald MacDonald who was ailing at the time, sought out a smaller rebel force rumored to be encamped along Moore’s Creek.

When the Loyalist soldiers arrived, they found that their quarry had withdrawn across a bridge after taking up its planks and greasing its supports. Armed primarily with pikes and broadswords, the Loyalists unwisely decided to advance across the compromised structure. The patriots under Col. Richard Caswell and Col. John Alexander Lillington opened fire with two swivel cannons and muskets, quickly leveling the struggling soldiers. The “battle” ended in short order with the Loyalists sustaining thirty killed and the Patriots only one.

When General Sir Henry Clinton arrived in the area in mid-March, no Loyalist army was waiting to join his offensive. After reassessing his situation, Genral Clinton joined with Brigadier General Charles, Lord Cornwallis and headed south to Charlestown and further disappointment.


"King George and Broadswords!" shouted Loyalists as they charged across the partially-dismantled Moore's Creek Bridge on February 27, 1776. Just beyond the bridge nearly a thousand North Carolina Patriots waited quietly with swivel cannons and muskets poised to fire.

The Loyalists, mostly Scottish Highlanders wielding broadswords and pikes, expected to find only a small Patriot force. As the Loyalists advanced across the bridge, Patriot shots rang out and dozens of Loyalists fell, including their commanders.

Stunned, outgunned and leaderless, the Loyalists surrendered, retreating in confusion. Wagons, weapons, and British sterling worth more than $1 million by today's value were seized by the Patriots in the days following the battle.

This dramatic victory ended British authority in the colony and greatly influenced North Carolina to be the first colony to vote for independence. The battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, coupled with the battle of Sullivan's Island near Charlestown a few months later, ultimately led the thirteen colonies to declare independence on July 4, 1776.

In early 1776, British General William Howe ordered General Sir Henry Clinton to sail south to rendezvous with Commodore Sir Peter Parker. Parker had sailed from Cork, Ireland with Brigadier General Charles, Lord Cornwallis and seven regiments of the British army. General Clinton and Commodore Parker would meet off the Cape Fear River in North Carolina.

British expectations were that there were large numbers of Loyalists clamoring to the British cause against a few upstart rebels. Some of these Loyalist forces were also expected to rendezvous with General Clinton at the Cape Fear River, most likely near Brunswick Town or Fort Johnston.

On February 20, 1776, 1,600 Scottish Highlanders set out from the Cross Creek area about one hundred miles from the coast under the command of Brigadier General Donald MacDonald. On February 26, they learned that 1,000 Patriots were waiting with two swivel cannons at Moore's Creek Bridge, which was six miles ahead. Brig. Gen. MacDonald was now too ill to actively command. A council of war was held where Brig. Gen. MacDonald recommended caution, but the younger officers wanted to attack.

The Loyalist council of war decided to attack at dawn on February 27, 1776. Lt. Colonel Donald McLeod took active command. At 1:00 a.m., they set out. Although they numbered 1,600, they had only 500 firearms. When they reached the bridge, they found empty entrenchments. The Patriots had withdrawn to the other side of the bridge.

An advance party found half of the bridge planks had been removed and the two stringers had been greased. But Lt. Col. McLeod would not be denied. An eighty-man assault force armed with broadswords was assembled under the command of Capt. John Campbell. The assault force followed Lt. Col. McLeod down one stringer and Capt. Campbell down the other to the beat of drums and the Scottish war pipes.

The Patriots held their fire until Capt. Campbell and Lt. Col. McLeod crossed the creek and then they let loose with their two swivel cannons and musket fire. No one was left standing on the bridge. Capt. Campbell and Lt. Col. McLeod were killed immediately. Some Loyalists fell into the creek and drowned. Their companions who had watched the quick defeat immediately retreated.

Thirty Loyalists were counted dead, while the Patriots had only two casualties, one of whom later died of his wounds - John Grady of Duplin County. 850 Loyalists were captured, including the sick Brigadier General Donald MacDonald. This quick defeat ended organized Loyalist activity in the area for several years. Less than two months later in April, North Carolina became to first state to vote for independence - the Halifax Resolves.

General Sir Henry Clinton arrived at the Cape Fear River on March 12, 1776 to find no Loyalists waiting for him. He remained there until May 31st, while Commodore Peter Parker's fleet straggled in after having been dispersed during its crossing because of storms. General Clinton and Commodore Parker now discussed what to do since their invasion of North Carolina had counted on Loyalists to augment their force. They settled on a direct assault on Charlestown in South Carolina, which would also end in defeat.

Moore's Creek Bridge 2/27/2011 - The 235th Anniversary of the Battle

Since this was the first significant engagement within North Carolina, there have been many historical accounts of what transpired on that fateful day. Long after the event, Richard Caswell wrote down his account of which Patriots participated, and this account is commonly referred to as "Caswell's List" - currently held in the North Carolina State Archives. Although this account is the most accurate and the most contemporaneous, it is not without errors - Caswell names some men who later asserted that they were "too late."

Conversely, since this was such an important historical event, some men later claimed to have participated when they were nowhere near the action. Therefore, one has to be somewhat skeptical when reviewing lists of participants - including what follows below.

First of all, both sides in this brief skirmish assembled fairly large groups of men - many that can be documented from more than one source. More important, however, is the simple fact that the skirmish was so brief and so confined to such a small parcel of dry land along a dark and deep creek, there are certainly limits as to just how many men - on each side - could have actually participated, materially. Nevertheless, one must include all of those that "showed up," whether they actually fired a musket or thrust a broadsword at their enemy.

But, where does the listing of those that "showed up" end?

Interestingly, although there were thousands of Loyalists spread across the entire state, those that marched towards Wilmington during February of 1776 were mostly from one general area - along the Cape Fear River in and around Cumberland County at that time (which included much of Harnett, Lee, and Moore counties nowadays). These were augmented with smaller numbers from Anson, Guilford, Chatham, Orange, Rowan, and neighboring Bladen counties. It is possible that more Loyalists were on their way from other parts of the state, but nothing has been documented to support this.

On the other hand, there is much evidence proving that the Patriots all across the state were very aware of just how significant this event would become. In reviewing thousands of veteran Pension Applications submitted in the early 1800s - and now on file in the US National Archives - it is clear that 23 of the 35 counties sent as many men as they could spare. Many did not make it in time. Some arrived after the brief firefight, but were actually engaged in rounding up the scattering Loyalists for days. Those in the Edenton District were ordered to remain near home to guard against a rumored threat of a British invasion somewhere along the northeastern shore of North Carolina.

As with any potential battle, things changed fairly quickly. Most Patriot units were instructed to meet at or near Cross Creek (what is now Fayetteville) and to join up with Col. James Moore of the 1st NC Regiment of the Continental Line, who had positioned his troops along Rockfish Creek, just south of Cross Creek. By the time that Col. Moore and the newly-arriving Militia and Minutemen reached Rockfish Creek on February 26th, the Loyalists had already passed and were completely unaware of what they had just missed - by accident.

In the meantime, on the day of February 25th, Col. John Alexander Lillington of the Wilmington District Minutemen stumbled across the Widow Moore's Creek bridge location and immediately realized that the marching Loyalists would have to come this way, and that this would be a perfect location to stop them. Col. Lillington sent word to Col. Richard Caswell who arrived the next day, and the two men concurred - the Patriots would stop the Loyalists at this location. Capt. Richard Clinton and Capt. James Love were instructed to hurriedly throw up breastworks in a defensive posture south of the creek, then instructed to remove the planks from the bridge and to grease the runners.

As the day of February 26th wore on, more Patriot units arrived and they were hastily instructed on where to camp and where to position their men. Even more Patriot units were struggling mightily just to get there, some coming from as far away as Surry County in the northwest and Northampton County in the northeast.

Realizing that the enemy had already passed them by, Col. James Moore of the 1st NC Regiment of Continentals assented to some of his men's request to go down the Cape Fear River in small boats to join up with Col. Richard Caswell and Col. John Alexander Lillington. Surviving pensioners later recounted that as many as seven companies from the 1st NC Regiment actually made their way in time to actively participate in this fateful event. All seven are identified herein, but there is plenty of evidence that some of these seven did not actually participate - either they were too late, or they never actually marched towards the battlefield - only history knows for sure.

Although Col. Robert Howe and most of his 2nd NC Regiment were stationed at Norfolk, Virginia, two companies were left at home in North Carolina. Capt. James Armstrong of Pitt County attached his small company of men under Col. Richard Caswell's New Bern District Minutemen. Capt. William Knox attached his unit under Lt. Col. James Martin of the Guilford County Regiment of Militia. Both companies actively participated in the battle at Moore's Creek Bridge.

The battle at Moore's Creek Bridge lasted only about 30 minutes early in the morning of February 27, 1776. Upon cessation of firing, hundreds of Loyalists adroitly realized that they had better withdraw, hoping to get back home without being caught. As luck would have it for the Patriots, many late arrivals got there just in time to witness the chaotic withdrawal and many Loyalists were taken prisoner. Lt. Col. James Martin and his regiment of Militia from Guilford County was one of these Patriot units that captured hundreds of Loyalists trying to escape. Although the Guilford County Regiment did not participate materially in the brief engagement along Moore's Creek, they did perform heroically after the fact by rounding up many Loyalists trying to escape.

As stated in his wonderful book entitled, "Roster of the Patriots in the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge," by Dr. Bobby Gilmer Moss (1992), there is no way to 100% accurately identify every participant at this important battle. Some names were simply never recorded. And, some men claimed to have participated but were really not there. In the same spirit as Dr. Moss, this author has chosen to include even those who were doubtful, just to err on the side of probability. For those who simply "fell through the crack," this is an unfortunate situation.

Known Patriot Participants

Known British/Loyalist Participants

Col. Richard Caswell - Commanding Officer

New Bern District Minutemen led by Col. Richard Caswell, Lt. Col. William Bryan, and Maj. James Gorham, with thirteen (13) known companies, led by:
- Capt. James Armstrong (2nd NC Regiment)
- Capt. John Council Bryan
- Capt. Thomas Caswell (Carteret County)
- Capt. Jesse Cobb
- Capt. John Enloe
- Capt. John Garland
- Capt. Edward Gatling
- Capt. William Green
- Capt. Frederick Hargett
- Capt. George Miller
- Capt. Spyars Singleton
- Capt. John Vance (Artillery)
- Capt. Thomas Williams

Wilmington District Minutemen led by Col. John Alexander Lillington and Maj. Samuel Swann, with four (4) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Thomas Bloodworth
- Capt. John DeVane, Sr.
- Capt. Joseph French
- Capt. James Love

Halifax District Minutemen led by Lt. Col. Henry Irwin, with five (5) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Pinketham Eaton
- Capt. Hart
- Capt. Isaac Horn
- Capt. Jonas Johnston
- Capt. Nicholas Long, Jr.

Hillsborough District Minutemen led by Col. James Thackston, Lt. Col. John Williams, and Maj. James Moore, with seven (7) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Charles Abercrombie
- Capt. Alexander Clark
- Capt. M. Jewett
- Capt. Archibald Lytle
- Capt. John Moore
- Capt. Wadell Tate
- Capt. John Williams

1st Battalion of Salisbury District Minutemen led by Col. Griffith Rutherford, with one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. William Ward

2nd Battalion of Salisbury District Minutemen* led by Col. Thomas Polk and Maj. John Phifer, with eleven (11) known companies, led by:
- Capt. James Alexander
- Capt. John McNitt Alexander
- Capt. James Barns
- Capt. Ephraim Brevard
- Capt. John Davidson
- Capt. Robert Irwin
- Capt. Matthew McClure
- Capt. John McRee
- Capt. Samuel Patton
- Capt. Caleb Phifer
- Capt. Robert Smith

*Only a few of these companies were actually in the 2nd Salisbury District Minutemen; the remainder were in the Mecklenburg County Regiment. No records have been found to identify the Colonel/Commandant of the Mecklenburg County Regiment at this point in time. Surviving pensioners in the 1830s could only identify that they served under Col. Thomas Polk, Lt. Col. Adam Alexander, or Major John Phifer at the battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, all documented as leaders of the 2nd Salisbury District Minutemen.

Halifax District Militia:

Halifax County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Col. Willis Alston, with one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. William Brinkley

Northampton County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Col. Allen Jones and Maj. Jeptha Eatherton, with one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. Benjamin Parker

Hillsborough District Militia:

Chatham County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Col. Ambrose Ramsey and Lt. Col. Jeduthan Harper, with four (4) known companies, led by:
- Capt. George Herndon
- Capt. Joseph Johnson
- Capt. Mial Scurlock
- Capt. James Wilkins

Granville County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Col. Joseph Taylor, Lt. Col. Charles Rust Eaton, and Maj. William Taylor, with one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. Micajah Bullock

Orange County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Col. John Hogan, Lt. Col. James Saunders, and Maj. Nathaniel Rochester, with one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. John Watson

Wake County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Col. John Hinton, Sr., Lt. Col. Theophilus Hunter, Maj. Thomas Hines, and Maj. John Hinton, Jr., with four (4) known companies, led by:
- Capt. James Hinton
- Capt. James Jones
- Capt. John Rochelle
- Capt. Michael Rogers

New Bern District Militia:

Craven County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Lt. Col. Council Bryan and Maj. John Bryant, Jr., with four (4) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Edmund Hatch
- Capt. Richard Nixon
- Capt. David Roach
- Capt. Archibald Weeks

Dobbs County Regiment of Militia led by Col. Abraham Sheppard, Maj. Martin Caswell, and Maj. William McKinnie, with eight (8) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William Fellows
- Capt. Joseph Green
- Capt. Jesse Jernigan
- Capt. Jacob Johnston
- Capt. Joseph Sessions
- Capt. Benjamin Sheppard
- Capt. John Sheppard
- Capt. Ezekiel Slocumb

Johnston County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Col. Needham Bryan, Lt. Col. William Bryan, Maj. John Smith, and Maj. Samuel Smith, Jr., with five (5) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Nathan Bryan
- Capt. William Bryant
- Capt. James Roach
- Capt. John Stephens
- Capt. Bryant Whitfield

Pitt County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Lt. Col. Robert Salter and Maj. Gordon, with four (4) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Simon Jones
- Capt. Robinson
- Capt. John Salter
- Capt. Godfrey Stancil

Salisbury District Militia:

Anson County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Maj. David Love, with two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Thomas Harris
- Capt. Thomas Wade

Guilford County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Lt. Col. James Martin and Maj. John Peasley, with twelve (12) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Robert Bell
- Capt. Thomas Blair
- Capt. John Buster
- Capt. John Carroll (Cumberland County)
- Capt. Arthur Forbis
- Capt. Landon Harris
- Capt. Alexander Hunter
- Capt. William Knox (2nd NC Regiment)
- Capt. John Leak
- Capt. John Nelson
- Capt. Samuel Sharp
- Capt. Nathaniel Williams

Surry County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Col. Martin Armstrong, Lt. Col. Joseph Williams, and Maj. Joseph Winston, with three (3) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Abiel Cobb
- Capt. John Hamlin
- Capt. William Shepherd

Tryon County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Col. William Graham, Maj. Thomas Beattie, and Maj. George Pearies, with eight (8) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Robert Alexander
- Capt. David Dowell
- Capt. Frederick Hambright
- Capt. Andrew Hampton
- Capt. Thomas Howard
- Capt. William Magness
- Capt. Richard Singleton
- Capt. Benjamin Vaughn

Wilmington District Militia:

Bladen County Regiment of Militia led by Col. Thomas Robeson, Jr., Lt. Col. Thomas Brown, Maj. Thomas Owens, and Maj. James Richardson, with eight (8) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Thomas Amis
- Capt. Stephen Anders
- Capt. Maturin Colville
- Capt. James Council
- Capt. William Ellis
- Capt. William Handing
- Capt. Nathaniel Richardson
- Capt. John Smith

Brunswick County Regiment of Militia detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. Thomas Callender

Cumberland County Regiment of Militia detachment of two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Arthur Council
- Capt. Ebenezer Folsome

Duplin County Regiment of Militia led by Col. James Kenan, Lt. Col. Richard Clinton, Maj. Robert Dixon, Maj. James Moore, and Maj. Thomas Routledge, with ten (10) known companies, led by:
- Capt. David Dodd
- Capt. Southy Fisher
- Capt. Nathan Hall
- Capt. Francis Hill
- Capt. Gabriel Holmes
- Capt. Michael King
- Capt. Abraham Moulton
- Capt. Alexander Outlaw
- Capt. William Taylor
- Capt. Frederick Wells

Onslow County Regiment of Militia detachment led by Col. William Cray and Lt. Col. Henry Rhodes, with three (3) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Matthew Allbritton (maybe, maybe not)
- Capt. John Cooper
- Capt. John King

Volunteer Independent Rangers (of New Hanover County) led by Col. John Ashe, Sr., with two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. John Ashe, Jr.
- Capt. R. Bennerman

1st NC Regiment detachment of seven (7) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Thomas Allen (little evidence)
- Capt. George Lee Davidson (little evidence)
- Capt. William Davis (boated from Cross Creek)
- Capt. Henry "Hal" Dixon (maybe, maybe not)
- Capt. Alfred Moore (marched from Brunswick)
- Capt. Robert Rowan (marched from Cross Crk)
- Capt. John Walker (marched from Wilmington)


Total Patriot Forces ~1,100 men
The following units are known to have marched towards the battle at Moore's Creek Bridge but were too late. Some completed their trip and assisted in escorting prisoners to various jails across the state. Some learned of the Patriot victory and simply turned around and headed back home to be discharged from duty.

2nd Salisbury District Minutemen:

- Capt. John Barringer
- Capt. Robert Mebane
- Capt. Jesse Walton

Anson County Regiment of Militia:

- Capt. Thomas Childs

Guilford County Regiment of Militia:

- Capt. William Bethel
- Capt. Dalton
- Capt. William Dent*
- Capt. Matthew DeWitt
- Capt. Thomas Dougan
- Capt. Thomas Flack

Mecklenburg County Regiment of Militia:

- Capt. John William Hagan
- Capt. James Harris
- Capt. James Jack
- Capt. Robert Mayberry
- Capt. Neal Morrison
- Capt. James Osborn
- Capt. Charles Polk

1st Rowan County Regiment of Militia:
- Maj. Hugh Brevard
- Capt. George Henry Barrier
- Capt. John Brandon
- Capt. David Caldwell
- Capt. Hugh Montgomery
- Capt. Robert Moore
- Capt. Patrick Morrison
- Capt. Jacob Nichols
- Capt. David Smith
- Capt. James Smith
- Capt. John Work

2nd Rowan County Regiment of Militia:
- Lt. Col. Christopher Beekman
- Capt. James Barr
- Capt. William Beekman
- Capt. William Lee Davidson
- Capt. John Harden
- Capt. William Moore
- Capt. James Morrison
- Capt. Reuben Morrison
- Capt. William Penland
- Capt. David Robinson
- Capt. Conrad Rudolph
- Capt. Reuben White

Tryon County Regiment of Militia:

- Capt. James Baird
- Capt. John Barber
- Capt. James Johnson
- Capt. Robert Porter
- Capt. George Taylor

Surry County Regiment of Militia:

- Capt. Jacob Free
- Capt. Richard Goode
- Capt. Francis Hargrove
- Capt. Jabez Jarvis
- Capt. Joseph Phillips

Hillsborough District Minutemen:

- Capt. William Hubbard
- Capt. Jesse Saunders
- Capt. Hugh Tinnen

Granville County Regiment of Militia:

- Capt. Cuthbert Hudson
- Capt. Thomas Satterwhite

Orange County Regiment of Militia:

- Capt. John Atkinson
- Capt. Eli McDaniel
- Capt. Daniel McFarland
- Capt. William Ray
- Capt. William Williams

Halifax District Minutemen:

- Capt. Pope
- Capt. John Whitaker

Bute County Regiment of Militia:

- Capt. James Denton
- Capt. Benjamin Seawell

Martin County Regiment of Militia:

- Capt. Thomas Hunter

Bladen County Regiment of Militia:

- Capt. William Davis
- Capt. William Hendon (at Elizabeth Town)

Cumberland County Regiment of Militia:

- Capt. Israel Folsome

Duplin County Regiment of Militia:

- Capt. William Dickson

New Hanover County Regiment of Militia:

- Capt. William Tract Jones


*Capt. William Dent of Guilford County was killed by Loyalists while on his way to the battle of Moore's Creek Bridge, and is considered to be the first Patriot casualty during the campaign.

Brig. Gen. Donald McDonald - Commanding Officer

North Carolina Provincials, led by Brig. Gen. Donald McDonald, with Aide-de-Camp Kenneth McDonald, Aaron Verdie as Wagon Master, Peter Hay bearing the Royal Colours, and Chaplain John Bethune.

Royal Highland Emigrants detachment led by Capt. Donald MacLeod, with unknown number of men

Cumberland County Loyalist Militia, led by Col. Thomas Rutherford (pretended to lead the Patriot militia for Cumberland County, then abruptly switched sides), with Lt. Col. James Cotton, Maj. Alexander McDonald, Adjutant Francis Frasier, Lt. Laughlin McKinnen, Lt. Kenneth Stuart, Commissary Alexander McLaine, QM Donald McLeod, QM Donald Stuart, and ~600 men in eighteen (18) known companies led by:
- Capt. Alexander McKay, with 38 men
- Capt. Alexander Morrison, with Lt. Donald McLeod, Ensign John McLeod, Ensign Donald Morrison, and 35 men
- Capt. Neill McArthur, with Lt. Archibald McEachern, and 55 men
- Capt. William Garner, with Ensign Thomas Bradford, and 73 men
- Capt. Angus Campbell, Lt. Daniel McLean, and 30 men
- Capt. Alexander McLeod with 16 men
- Capt. Angus McDonald with 30 men
- Capt. James Mews with 54 men
- Capt. John McLeod with 35 men
- Capt. Thomas Weir with 30 men
- Capt. John McKenzie with 43 men
- Capt. Morris Nowland with 20 men
- Capt. Robert Turner with 18 men
- Capt. Alexander Stuart with 30 men
- Capt. John Doak
- Lt. John Mulkeson with 40 men
- Lt. James Munroe with 50 men

The "Company of Men that Shot Capt. William Dent*" - Samuel Divining, James Low, Stephen Lisney, Frederick Craft, Robert Adams

Volunteers (units unknown) - D'Arcy Fowler, Thomas Bradford, William Draper, Jeremiah Field, William Shannon, William Armfield, Stephen Parker, William Bradford, Duncan St. Clair, John Simmons, Thomas Collins, George Mylne (confiscated Patrior gunpowder), James Thomas, John McDonald, Daniel Cameron, Malcom McNeill.

Anson County Loyalist Militia, led by Lt. Col. Donald McLeod, with Maj. Samuel Snead, Adjutant John Smith, Surgeon Murdock McLeod, and an unknown number of men in seven (7) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Alexander McLeod, with 32 men
- Capt. John McDonald, with 40 men
- Capt. James McDonald, with Lt. John McLeod, Ensign Norman McLeod, and 25 men
- Capt. Murdock McAskell, with 34 men
- Capt. Alexander McRae, with 47 men
- Capt. Lewis Lowery
- Capt. Nathaniel Stead, with 7 men

Anson County volunteers, units unknown - Alexander McDonald, Hugh McDonald, Rory McKinnen

Guilford County Loyalist Militia, led by Col. William Field, with four (4) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Robert Field, with Lt. Joseph Field, Joseph Dobson, and 60 men
- Capt. David Jackson with 40 men
- Capt. Seymore Yorke, with Lt. Daniel McDaniel, Ensign John Downing, and 34 men
- Capt. Robinson York with 27 men

Orange County Loyalist Militia detachment of two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Michael Holt with 37 men
- Capt. Enoch Bradley with 13 men

Bladen County Loyalist Militia detachment of two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Alexander Legate, Lt. Collin McIver and 80 men
- Capt. Jacob Pope, with 49 men

Chatham County Loyalist Militia, led by Capt. John Pyle, Sr., with 50 men, including John Pyles, Jr., William Austin

Rowan County Loyalist Militia detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. Matthias Sapinfield with 7 men


Total Loyalist Forces ~1,800 men

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© 2012 - J.D. Lewis - PO Box 1188 - Little River, SC 29566 - All Rights Reserved