Governor William Tryon's Executive Council

Dates: 1763 to 1771

Locations Met: See Below

On April 3rd (Wednesday), April 6th (Saturday), April 8th (Monday), April 16th (Tuesday), and April 17th (Wednesday) of 1765, the Executive Council met in Wilmington. Those present were:
- Lt. Gov. William Tryon
- James Murray
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- William Dry
- Robert Palmer
- Benjamin Heron

Murray, Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Dry, Palmer, and Heron were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

It was announced that Governor Arthur Dobbs died on March 28, 1765 at Town Creek in Brunswick County. Lt. Gov. William Tryon became Governor (Pro Tempore) until he receives his commission as full governor from the Crown in December of 1765.

Lt. Gov. William Tryon had all Members of His Majesty's Council to retake their oaths of office and allegiance. He then issued a proclamation directing all civil and military officers to continue their duties until further notice.

The Lt. Governor and Executive Council issued a proclamation for the General Assembly to meet in New Bern on May 2nd.

The Lt. Governor and Executive Council addressed petitions for Land Patents/Warrants and the proving of headrights.

On 4/6, John Sampson arrived and retook the oaths of office and allegiance, then retook his seat on this Executive Council.

On 4/16, Charles Berry arrived and retook the oaths of office and allegiance, then retook his seat on this Executive Council.

On 4/17, James Murray requested a twelve (12) month leave for personal reasons - it was approved.

On May 7th (Tuesday), May 9th (Thursday), May 15th (Wednesday), May 17th (Friday), and May 18th (Saturday) of 1765, the Executive Council met in New Bern, presumably in the Council Chamber. Those present were:
- Lt. Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- William Dry
- Robert Palmer
- Benjamin Heron

Charles Berry arrived on 5/9.

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Sampson, Dry, Palmer, Heron, and Berry were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Alexander McCulloch arrived and retook the oaths of office and allegiance, then retook his seat on this Executive Council.

On 5/9, Henry Eustace McCulloch presented his lengthy response to complaints made against him and his father, Henry McCulloch. He was told to wait until later.

Lt. Gov. William Tryon issued a proclamation to various people who have obtained Land Patents granted in South Carolina for them to produce these Land Patents in person to the Executive Council on or before April 25, 1766.

On 5/15, Henry Eustace McCulloch verbalized his lengthy response in depth. The Lt. Governor and Executive Council decided that they had no authority in this matter.

Lt. Gov. William Tryon issued a proclamation to the inhabitants of Mecklenburg County to identify "rioters" who abused employees of Henry Eustace McCulloch.

On 5/18, Lt. Gov. William Tryon issued a proclamation to prorogue the General Assembly until November 29th.

On July 19, 1765, the Crown commissions William Tryon as the new Royal Governor of North Carolina. It does not arrive in North Carolina until December.

On October 24th (Thursday), October 26th (Saturday), October 28th (Monday), and October 30th (Wednesday) of 1765, the Executive Council met in Brunswick Town. Those present were:
- Lt. Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- Robert Palmer

Charles Berry and William Dry arrived on 10/28.

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Sampson, Palmer, Berry and Dry were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The Lt. Governor and Executive Council addressed petitions for Land Patents/Warrants and the proving of headrights.

Lt. Gov. William Tryon issued a proclamation to prorogue the General Assembly until November 27th.

On December 20-21, 1765, the Executive Council met in Wilmington. Those present were:
- Lt. Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- Alexander McCulloch
- Charles Berry
- William Dry
- Robert Palmer
- Benjamin Heron

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Sampson, McCulloch, Berry, Dry, Palmer, and Heron were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

William Tryon presented his new commission as governor and he took the oaths of office and allegiance. He then required all Members of His Majesty's Council to retake their oaths of office and allegiance as well.

On 12/21, Governor William Tryon issued a proclamation to dissolve the General Assembly. He then issued a Writ of Election for a new General Assembly to be held in New Bern on April 22, 1766.

It was noted in the records that Robert Jones, Jr. was the Attorney General of North Carolina as this point in time.

On December 24, 1765, the Crown issued their instructions to Gov. William Tryon - very long and detailed.

On January 6, 1766, the Executive Council met in Brunswick Town. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- William Dry

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, and Dry were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Thomas Rutherford is the new Deputy Clerk of Council. He took the oaths of office and allegiance.

Governor William Tryon announced that the "Stamp Papers" had arrived in Cape Fear on the Sloop of War Diligence - Constantin Phipps as Commander. He then issued a proclamation that no one can plead ignorance of their existence and authorized distributors may apply to the Commander of the Diligence, which was now at Brunswick Town.

Governor William Tryon then announced that Charles Berry is now deceased. He appointed James Hassell as Chief Justice, which the Executive Council approved.

On February 5, 1766, John Stuart - Superintendent of Indian Affairs - sent a letter to Governor William Tryon. The Cherokees want a boundary surveyed between the white settlers and their hunting grounds.

On February 25, 1766, Governor William Tryon sent a letter to Henry Seymour Conway - Secretary of State in London:

- He described an "illegal assembly of men in arms" on February 19, 1766 at Brunswick Town.
- He described the garrison at Fort Johnston on the Cape Fear River under Capt. Dalrymple.
- He described letters presented by George Moore and Cornelius Harnett.
- He then told of Col. James Moore and many men arriving on February 21st at his personal residence near Brunswick Town. On the same date, Cornelius Harnett with 60 armed men came to speak to Mr. Pennington. Tryon stated that Mr. Pennington was under his protection, but Harnett convinced Pennington to leave with him. Tryon convinced Pennington to resign his office before he was led away. Pennington was obliged to take an oath that he would never issue any "Stamp Paper" until the Stamp Act should be received generally in the province.
- After that, Tryon learned that the cannons at Fort Johnston had been spiked.
- On 2/22, Tryon and Capt. Phipps went to Fort Johnston, found Capt. Dalrymple sick in bed, only two men in the garrison, and all cannons had been spiked.
- Tryon estimated that the "insurrection" amounted to 500 armed men and 100 unarmed men. They included the Mayor of Wilmington, most of the Gentlemen and Planters of Brunswick, New Hanover, Duplin, and Bladen counties, plus several masters of vessels along the Cape Fear River.

On February 26, 1766, the Executive Council met in Brunswick Town. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- William Dry
- Benjamin Heron

Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Sampson, Dry, and Heron were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Governor William Tryon presented his letter (directly above) to the Secretary of State about the recent disturbance in Brunswick Town. He issued a proclamation commanding all civil and military officials to exert their authority in suppressing all such illegal proceedings.

The Governor and Executive Council agreed to prorogue the General Assembly until April 22nd, then extended it to October 30, 1766, in hopes of getting instructions from London on recent affairs.

The Governor and Executive Council issued a proclamation prohibiting the exportation of corn from the Neuse and Trent rivers due to shortages.

On March 31, 1766, the Crown sent a letter to all provinces - the Stamp Act has been repealed.

On June 28, 1766, the Executive Council met in Brunswick Town. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- Robert Palmer
- Benjamin Heron

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Palmer, and Heron were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Governor William Tryon presented his new instructions, dated December 24, 1765 (above).

Governor William Tryon then presented several letters from John Stuart - Superintendent of Indian Affairs. He and the Executive Council approved surveying the boundary between white settlers and the Cherokee hunting grounds.

Govvernor William Tryon then presented the Crown's advice - Public Officials must not charge exhorbitant fees for their services.

Governor William Tryon then presented the recent repeal of several resolutions, including the repeal of the Stamp Act. He then issued a proclamation telling all citizens of its repeal, and advising everyone to get back to business as usual.

The records noted that Benjamin Heron is Secretary of North Carolina.

On July 14, 1766, Governor William Tryon commissioned Robert Howe as Captain over Fort Johnston.
On July 20, 1766, the Crown commissioned Martin Howard as the new Chief Justice, replacing Charles Berry, now deceased.

On September 22-27, 1766, the Executive Council met in Wilmington. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- William Dry
- Robert Palmer
- Benjamin Heron

John Sampson arrived on 9/23.

Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Dry, Palmer, and Heron were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The Governor and Executive Council addressed petitions for Land Patents/Warrants and the proving of headrights.

On November 3rd (Monday), November 7th (Friday), November 8th (Saturday), November 14th (Friday), November 18th (Tuesday), November 24th (Monday), November 29th (Saturday), November 30th (Sunday), and December 1st (Monday) of 1766, the Executive Council met in New Bern, presumably in the Council Chamber. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- Alexander McCulloch
- William Dry
- Benjamin Heron

Robert Palmer arrived on 11/7. John Rutherfurd arrived on 11/18.

Hassell, De Rosset, Sampson, McCulloch, Dry, Heron, Palmer, and Rutherfurd were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Henry Eustace McCulloch arrived, took new oaths of office, then retook his seat on this Executive Council.

Robert Howe presented his commission as Captain over Fort Johnston, then took the oaths of office and allegiance.

On 11/8, Governor William Tryon read aloud an address of the House of Burgesses in response to his recent speech therein. He and the Executive Council do not approve and asserted that all changes therein were without merit.

On 11/14, Governor William Tryon informs the Executive Council that the General Assembly intends to pass a resolution to erect a "public edifice" in New Bern for the governor.

On 12/1, the Governor and Executive Council prorogued the General Assembly until June 8th.

It was noted in the records that St. Patrick's Parish was in Dobbs County.

On January 23, 1767, the Executive Council met in Wilmington. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- Benjamin Heron

Rutherfurd, De Rosset, and Heron were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Martin Howard presented his mandamus as the new Chief Justice and took the oaths of office and allegiance.

Governor William Tryon issued a proclamation to prohibit the exportation of corn from Brunswick and Onslow counties.

On February 16, 1767, Governor William Tryon sent a letter to John Stuart, Superintendent of Indian Affairs. He asked Stuart to arrange a meeting with the Cherokes in Salisbury on May 16th. We will run the line westward. He then asked Stuart to prepare a draft license for "Indian Traders" and he will get the General Assembly to review it.
On February 20,1767, the Crown issued a mandamus to Samuel Strudwick as a Member of His Majesty's Council, in place of Richard Speight, recently deceased.
On March 2, 1767, John Stuart - Superintendent of Indian Affairs - sent a letter to Governor William Tryon. He received Tryon's letter, dated Feb. 16th (above). Stuart reported the murder of seven (7) Indian Traders near the town of Cowie in the Middle Settlements. He also sent a draft of a proclamation on Indian Trade.
On March 31, 1767, John Stuart sent another letter to Governor William Tryon. Stuart will meet with the Creeks on April 10th near Augusta, GA. He will try to meet up with Governor Tryon in May as he requested.

On April 15th (Wednesday), April 16th (Thursday), April 18th (Saturday), April 20th (Monday), April 21st (Tuesday), April 22nd (Wednesday), April 23rd (Thursday), April 24th (Friday), April 25th (Saturday), and April 27th (Monday) of 1767, the Executive Council met in Wilmington. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- Henry Eustace McCulloch
- William Dry
- Robert Palmer
- Benjamin Heron

James Hassel arrived on 4/18. John Rutherfurd arrived on 4/21.

De Rosset, Sampson, McCulloch, Dry, Palmer, Heron, Hassell, and Rutherfurd were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Governor William Tryon presented several letters from John Stuart, Superintendent of Indian Affairs (above). The Executive Council agreed for him to travel westward to meet with the Cherokees.

The Governor and Executive Council agreed that the currently-prorogued General Assembly had no promising business, so they prorogued it even longer - until December 2nd in New Bern.

On 4/23, John Wentwort presented his commission as Surveyor General of "all colonies" in North America.

On 4/24, Henry Eustace McCulloch requested a leave for twelve (12) months as Customs Collector at Roanoke and as a Member of His Majesty's Council. His request was granted.

On June 13, 1767, there is a record of Governor William Tryon meeting with the Cherokees. He appointed John Rutherfurd, Robert Palmer, and John Frohock to be commissioners to run the boundary line between the frontiers of North Carolina and the Cherokee hunting grounds. The line was to begin at Elm Tree on the south side of Reedy River where the SC line terminates and run thence 50 miles northward into the mountains to a Spanish Oak on the head waters of White Oak and Pacolet creeks, then a direct line to Col. John Chiswell's lead mines in southwestern Virginia.

On July 11-12, 1767, the Executive Council met in Brunswick Town. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- William Dry
- Benjamin Heron

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Dry, and Heron were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Governor William Tryon announced that the Crown has established fees for all offices. He then also announced that the Crown has restored James Murray to his seat on His Majesty's Council in this province.

Governor William Tryon presented letters and notices of "running the Western Boundary Line of this Province and the Cherokee Hunting Grounds" with a "Deed of Ratification" signed on June 13, 1767 (directly above). He then issued a proclamation about this new boundary and ordered all white settlers living in what is now Indian lands to remove themselves by January 1, 1768. There will be no new land grants within one mile of this new boundary. Anyone wanting to trade with the Indians must now have a license - proclamation was dated July 16, 1767.

On 7/12, Governor William Tryon issued a proclamation ordering all civil and military officers to assist in apprehending "gangs of rogues and horse stealers" who harbor themselves near the NC/SC state line when extended to Reedy River. Again, dated July 16, 1767.

John Rutherfurd confirmed that the said boundary line survey has been completed as directed.

On October 14th (Wednesday), October 15th (Thursday), October 16th (Friday), October 20th (Tuesday), October 21st (Wednesday), October 22nd (Thursday), October 23rd (Friday), October 24th (Saturday), October 26th (Monday), and October 27th (Tuesday) of 1767, the Executive Council met in Wilmington. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- William Dry
- Benjamin Heron

John Sampson arrived on 10/20. John Hassell arrived on 10/22. Robert Palmer arrived on 10/23.

Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Dry, Heron, Sampson, Hassell, and Palmer were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Thomas McGuire presented his mandamus as Attorney General and took the oaths of office and allegiance.

The Governor and Executive Council addressed petitions for Land Patents/Warrants and the proving of headrights.

It was recorded that John Rutherfurd was now Receiver General at this point in time.

On December 14th (Monday), December 15th (Tuesday), and December 19th (Saturday), the Executive Council met in New Bern, presumably in the Council Chamber. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- Alexander McCulloch
- William Dry
- Robert Palmer
- Benjamin Heron

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Sampson, McCulloch, Dry, Palmer, and Heron were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Samuel Strudwick presented his mandamus as a Member of His Majesty's Council, dated February 20, 1767. He took the oaths of office and allegiance, then took his seat on this Executive Council.

Governor William Tryon presented a new Great Seal of this province, dated July 9, 1767. Per instructions, he has already sent the old seal back to London.

On January 13th (Wednesday) and January 15th (Friday) of 1768, the Executive Council met in New Bern, presumably in the Council Chamber. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassel
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- Alexander McCulloch
- William Dry
- Robert Palmer
- Benjamin Heron
- Samuel Strudwick

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Sampson, McCulloch, Dry, Palmer, Heron, and Strudwick were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Governor William Tryon presented the Crown's approval of one (1) Act, and their repeal of three (3) Acts. He then issued a proclamation announcing this information.

On 1/15, Governor William Tryon issued a proclamation to prevent the abuses of Clerks of Courts. He then issued another proclamation to prorogue the General Assembly until May 31st.

On March 1, 1768, the Executive Council met in Wilmington. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- William Dry
- Benjamon Heron
- Samuel Strudwick

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Dry, Heron, and Strudwick were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The Governor and Executive Council filled vacancies in various courts, and issued a Writ of Election for Anson County.

On March 28, 1768, the Executive Council met in Brunswick Town. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- John Rutherfurd
- William Dry
- Benjamin Heron

Rutherfurd, Dry, and Heron were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The Governor and Executive Council appointed new Justices of the Peace for Granville, Johnston, and Brunswick counties.

On April 26-29, 1768, the Executive Council met in Wilmington. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- Robert Palmer
- Benjamin Heron
- Samuel Strudwick

William Dry arrived on 4/26 or 4/27 (two sources).

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Palmer, Heron, Strudwick, and Dry were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The Governor and Executive Council addressed petitions for Land Patents/Warrants and the proving of headrights.

On 4/27, Governor William Tryon informed the Executive Council that he received dispatches from Col. Edmund Fanning of the Orange County Regiment of Militia about several disturbances in Orange County. The Governor and Executive Council agreed to issue a proclamation demanding that the insurrectionists to disperse, otherwise, lawful means will be taken to apprehend them.

On 4/29, the Governor and Executive Council agreed to prorogue the General Assembly until June 15th.

In May of 1768, the "Regulators" sent a letter to Governor William Tryon and it included a petition from many Orange County citizens.

On May 17, 1768, the Executive Council met in Brunswick Town. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- William Dry
- Benjamin Heron
- Samuel Strudwick

Hassell, De Rosset, Dry, Heron, and Strudwick were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Governor William Tryon presented a letter from Col. Samuel Spencer, dated April 28, 1768, informing him and the Executive Council of more insurrections, this time in Anson County. He then issued another proclamation to the citizens of Anson County, similar to the previous one sent to Orange County (above).

The Governor and Executive Council further prorogued the General Assembly until January 12, 1769.

On May 31, 1768, the Executive Council met in Wilmington. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- William Dry
- Benjamin Heron
- Samuel Strudwick

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Dry, Heron, and Strudwick were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The records noted that several decisions from London were discussed.

On June 4, 1768, the Executive Council met in Brunswick Town. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- John Sampson
- William Dry
- Benjamin Heron

Hassell, Rutherfurd, Sampson, Dry, and Heron were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The records noted that the Crown has sent the Sloop of War Martin under Capt. Thomas Heyward to cruise North Carolina shores from Cape Hatteras to Cape Fear.

On June 20, 1768, the Executive Council met in Brunswick Town. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- William Dry
- Benjamin Heron
- Samuel Strudwick

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Dry, Heron, and Strudwick were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Governor William Tryon presented several papers about recent disturbances in Orange County. The Governor and Executive Council agreed to bring in Col. Edmund Fanning to receive their thanks.

On August 13, 1768, the Executive Council met in Hillsborough. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- Alexander McCulloch
- Robert Palmer
- Samuel Strudwick

McCulloch, Palmer, and Strudwick were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Governor William Tryon described being a witness to the "insurrectionists" who continue their "unlawful assemblies." He issued a letter via the Orange County sheriff to submit their payments of levies.

The Sheriff returned and told the Governor and Executive Council that the "insurgents" to a man continued to refuse to pay any levy and threatened the life of anyone who attempted to make them.

Governor William Tryon recounted a letter he received from persons styling themselves as "Regulators." On August 11th, he received intelligence that about 1,000 were "assembled in arms" within twenty (20) miles of Hillsborough, so he called out the local militia and the 1,000 dispersed. He then had over 400 men and officers to take an oath of loyalty, then dispersed them, too.

The Executive Council advised him to send a long letter to the "Regulators."

October 1, 1768, the Executive Council met in Hillsborough. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- Robert Palmer
- Benjamin Heron
- Samuel Strudwick

Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Sampson, Palmer, Heron, and Strudwick were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The records noted that many "insurgents" have laid down their arms and asked for a pardon.

The Governor and Executive Council issued a proclamation, dated October 3, 1768, granting a general pardon except for thirteen (13) named men:
- James Hunter
- Ninian Hamilton
- Peter Craven
- Isaac Jackson
- Herman Husband
- Matthew Hamilton
- William Payne
- Ninian Bell Hamilton
- Malachi Fyke
- William Moffitt
- Christopher Nation
- Solomon Gross
- John O'Neal

On October 14, 1768, a treaty was made between the Cherokee Indians and the "southern district" - Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina.

On November 24th (Thursday) and November 29th (Tuesday) of 1768, the Executive Council met in New Bern, presumably in the Council Chamber. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- William Dry
- Robert Palmer
- Benjamin Heron
- Samuel Strudwick

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Sampson, Dry, Palmer, Heron, and Strudwick were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The Governor and Executive Council agreed to pardon two young men for their offenses, then issued a proclamation offering a reward for the main instigator.

Governor William Tryon acknowledged John Sampson as a Member of His Majesty's Council and had him retake the oaths of office.

Governor William Tryon acknowledged Thomas McGuire as the new Attorney General and had him take the oaths of office.

On 11/29, the Governor and Executive Council issued a proclamation offering a reward for a murderer in Cornwall who escaped on a ship bound for the colonies. They then issued another proclamation on London's repeal of one Act passed by the North Carolina General Assembly.

On December 5-6, 1768, the Executive Council met in New Bern, presumably in the Council Chamber. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- William Dry
- Robert Palmer
- Benjamin Heron

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Sampson, Dry, Palmer, and Heron were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The records noted that John Harvey is the current Speaker of the House of Burgesses.

The Governor and Executive Council agreed to prorogue the General Assembly until June 1, 1769.

On December 21-23, 1768, the Executive Council met in Wilmington. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- Robert Palmer
- Benjamin Heron

Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Sampson, Palmer, and Heron were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The Governor and Executive Council addressed petitions for Land Patents/Warrants and requests for resurveys.

Governor William Tryon read aloud a letter from Crown officials - the quit-rents are still not coming in adequately.

On April 14, 1769, the Executive Council met in Brunswick Town. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- William Dry
- Benjamin Heron
- Samuel Strudwick

Hassell, De Rosset, Dry, Heron, and Strudwick were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Governor William Tryon presented the Treaty with the Cherokees, dated October 14, 1768 (above), then described several abuses by white settlers in North Carolina.

The records noted that a discussion followed about complaints made by citizens of Mecklenburg Councy about land and survey disputes between North Carolina and South Carolina officials.

On May 2-6, 1769, the Executive Council met in Wilmington. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- Robert Palmer
- Benjamin Heron
- Samuel Strudwick

Lewis Henry De Rosset and William Dry arrived on 5/3.

Hassell, Palmer, Heron, Strudwick, De Rosset, and Dry were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The Governor and Executive Council addressed petitions for Land Patents/Warrants and requests for resurveys.

On 5/5, John Burgwin presented his Crown commission as Master in the High Court of Chancery and he took the oaths of office and allegiance.

On 5/6, the Governor and Executive Council agreed to dissolve the General Assembly and issued a new Writ of Elections for the next General Assembly to meet on October 19th in New Bern.

Benjamin Heron requested a twelve (12) month leave to go to England for recovery of his health. This was granted.

On November 4th (Saturday) and November 10th (Friday) of 1769, the Executive Council met in New Bern, presumably in the Council Chamber. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- Alexander McCulloch
- William Dry
- Robert Palmer

Hassell, De Rosset, Sampson, McCulloch, Dry, and Palmer were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Alexander McCulloch raised the issue that James Murray and Edward Brice Dobbs have been absent from this province for over two years, then it was agreed that Governor William Tryon should suspend them as Members of His Majesty's Council.

On 11/10, the Governor and Executive Council appointed new Justices of the Peace for Tryon, Johnston, Carteret, Anson, Bute, Rowan, and Orange counties. They then issued a Writ of Elections for a new General Assembly to meet on May 1, 1770 in New Bern.

On December 13th (Wednesday), December 14th (Thursday), December 15th (Friday), December 16th (Saturday), and December 18th (Monday) of 1769, the Executive Council met in Brunswick Town. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- William Dry
- Robert Palmer

Hassell, De Rosset, Sampson, Dry, and Palmer were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The Governor and Executive Council addressed petitions for Land Patents/Warrants and requests for resurveys.

On 12/15, the records noted that the citizens of Mecklenburg County complained that they were bing taxed twice via quitrents - for the Crown's lands and for ex-Governor Arthur Dobbs's tract.

On 12/18, the records noted that John Rutherfurd - Receiver General - was unwell.

On April 5th (Thursday), April 6th (Friday), April 7th (Saturday), and April 9th (Monday) of 1770, the Executive Council met in Brunswick Town. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- William Dry
- Robert Palmer

Lewis Henry De Rosset arrived on 4/6.

Hassell, Rutherfurd, Dry, Palmer, and De Rosset were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The Governor and Executive Council addressed petitions for Land Patents/Warrants and requests for resurveys.

On 4/9, the Governor and Executive Council agreed to prorogue the General Assembly currently scheduled to meet on May 1st and defer this assembly until November 30th.

The records noted that a letter from Associate Judge Maurice Moore in Salisbury was discussed - citizens from several counties in the Salisbury District complained that "People who call themselves Regulators" will not let public officials collect the public tax.

The Governor and Executive Council issued a proclamation to all sheriffs to do their best in collecting taxes, then come to the next General Assembly in November to report on their collections.

On May 9, 1770, the Crown issued a mandamus to Martin Howard to be a Member of His Majesty's Council in place of James Murray.
On May 10, 1770, the Crown issued a mandamus to Samuel Cornell to be a member of His Majesty's Council in place of Edward Brice Dobbs.

On May 12, 1770, the Executive Council met in Brunswick Town. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- William Dry

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, and Dry were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The Governor and Executive Council issued a proclamation offering a reward for apprehending two murderers.

On July 9, 1770, Gov. William Tryon issued a charter for the town of Hillsborough.
On September 29, 1770, Associate Justice Richard Henderson sent a letter to Governor William Tryon:
- On Monday, September 24th, Hillsborough was filled with a great number of unruly people.
- At 11:00 am, the court was opened and the insurgents entered with whips and switches.
- A Mr. Fields insisted on speaking before the court began. He represented those here, who call themselves "Regulators," and they were determined to have their causes tried in this court.
- After an hour, most of the mob left the court house. They then attacked Mr. John Williams, then Mr. Edmund Fanning, with many blows, but both found safety. Several others were severaly whipped, and many others almost, but they escaped the wrath.
- After four or five hours, their rage subsided and they escorted Richard Henderson to his lodgings. He soon thereafter escaped the town.
- The next day, the mob almost killed Edmund Fanning, but cooler heads prevailed. However, they did break into his home and destroyed his furniture, his papers, and most of his clothing.
- The insurgents left the town on Wednesday (9/26) after breaking many windows.
On September 30, 1770, several officials of Orange County sent a petition to Governor William Tryon - they were fearful of their lives.
In October of 1770, 174 inhabitants of Orange County, who call themselves "Regulators," sent a petition to the Chief Justice and Associate Justices stating that their taxes and fees were unlawful.
On October 9th, Ralph McNair provided a deposition that described many of the "Regulators" events from September 24th to September 26th.

On October 16th (Tuesday) and October 18th (Thursday) of 1770, the Executive Council met in the Council Chamber in New Bern. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- Robert Palmer

Alexander McCulloch arrived on 10/18.

Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Palmer, McCulloch, adn Cornell were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Samuel Cornell arrived and presented his mandamus as a Member of His Majesty's Council. He then took the oaths of office and allegiance and his seat on this Executive Council.

Governor William Tryon described the contents of Richard Henderson's letter (above), the petition from the "Regulators" to the Chief Justice and Associate Justices (above), the petition from Orange County officials (above), and a deposition from Ralph McNair (above). He asked the Executive Council and the Attorney General to review all of these items and to give him their recommendations.

The Governor and Executive Council issued a proclamation about counterfeit certificates and offered a reward to anyone who could identify those passing these illegal notes.

On 10/18, the Attorney General recommended calling out the militia. The Governor and Executive Council agreed to issue a proclamation - all appropriate civil authorities were to gather many depositions and bring them in to the General Assembly on November 30th.

News arrived that Benjamin Heron had died this morning (10/18).

Governor William Tryon appointed John London as Secretary and Clerk of the Council. He then appointed John Hawkes as Clerk of the Pleas. He then appointed William Palmer as Naval Officer. He then appointed Charles Heron as Auditor.

On November 19, 1770, the Executive Council met in the Council Chamber in New Bern. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- Robert Palmer
- Samuel Cornell

Palmer and Cornell were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Martin Howard arrived and presented his mandamus as a Member of His Majesty's Council. He took the oaths of office and allegiance then took his seat on this Executive Council.

Richard Henderson informed Governor William Tryon last evening that his house, stables, and corn crib in Granville County had been set on fire and destroyed by persons unknown.

Thomas Henderson arrived and testified to the Executive Council that on Monday, November 12th, the events described by Richard Henderson did, in fact, happen. Then, on Wednesday, November 14th, another house of Richard Henderson was also burned by persons unknown.

The Governor and Executive Council agreed to issue a proclamation offering a reward for anyone who apprehended the offenders described by Richard and Thomas Henderson.

Richard and Thomas Henderson were both of the opinion that a large body of those who called themselves "Regulators" will most likely come to New Bern to intimidate the General Assembly when it meets later this month. The Governor and Executive Council agreed to write to all colonels of the militia to hold their regiments in readiness.

On December 4th (Tuesday), December 8th (Saturday), December 10th (Monday), December 11th (Tuesday), December 17th (Monday), December 20th (Thursday), December 22nd (Saturday), December 24th (Monday), and December 31st (Monday) of 1770, the Executive Council met in the Council Chamber in New Bern. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Alexander McCulloch
- William Dry
- Robert Palmer
- Samuel Cornell

Lewis Henry De Rosset, John Sampson, and Martin Howard arrived on 12/8.

Hassell, Rutherfurd, McCulloch, Dry, Palmer, Cornell, De Rosset, Sampson, and Howard were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Governor William Tryon presented a ltter he received this morning from Col. John Simpson of the Pitt County Regiment of Militia - he learned that many "Regulators" were on their way to New Bern from Bute and Johnston counties to stop Col. Edmund Fanning from taking his seat in the General Assembly. Col. Simpson had issued orders for several companies to mee him at Pitt Court House next Wednesday to march to New Bern to protect the General Assembly.

The Governor and Executive Council agreed to order the colonel over the Craven County Regiment of Militia, already under arms in this town, to remain here and protect the General Assembly until further notice.

On 12/8, the Governor and Executive Council addressed petitions for Land Patents/Warrants and requests for resurveys.

On 12/20, Governor William Tryon informed the Executive Council that the House of Burgesses has expelled one of its members - Herman Husbands - because he is a "Regulator" and was a principal in the recent "riots and seditions" in Orange County. The Governor, Executive Council, and Attorney General all agreed that Herman Husbands must be taken into custody.

On 12/31, John London resigned as Secretary and Clerk of Council. Governor William Tryon appointed Robert Palmer in his place, and he took the oaths of office and allegiance.

On January 2nd (Wednesday), January 5th (Saturday), January 12th (Saturday), January 19th (Saturday), January 21st (Monday), January 26th (Saturday), and January 28th (Monday) of 1771, the Executive Council met in the Council Chamber in New Bern. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- John Sampson
- William Dry
- Robert Palmer
- Martin Howard
- Samuel Cornell

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Sampson, Dry, Palmer, Howard, and Cornell were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Governor William Tryon presented a message from the House of Burgesses requesting that all records and papers now residing in Wilmington be safely conveyed to New Bern. The Governor and Executive Council agreed and ordered that this be done.

On 1/19, information was brought to the Executive Council that "Regulators" in Orange County were still assembling and bringing fear to the inhabitants.

On 1/21, the Governor and Executive Council agreed to issue a proclamation banning the exportation of corn due to heavy losses caused by heavy rains this past summer.

On 1/26, the Governor and Executive Council agreed to prorogue the General Assembly until May 10th in New Bern.

On February 7th (Thursday), February 13th (Wednesday), February 23rd (Saturday), and February 27th (Wednesday) of 1771, the Executive Council met in the Council Chamber in New Bern. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- Robert Palmer
- Martin Howard
- Samuel Cornell

Hassell, Palmer, Howard, and Cornell were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Governor William Tryon read a letter from Francis Nash of Hillsborough informing him of a large body of people who call themselves "the Mob" are assembling to march upon New Bern to get Herman Husbands out of confinement and to lay New Bern to ashes. The Governor and Executive Council agreed to issue a proclamation advising the public of this information and in restricting the sale of firearms and ammunition.

On 2/23, Governor William Tryon read a letter, dated February 20, 1771, from Col. Richard Caswell, commander of the Dobbs County Regiment of Militia. Col. Caswell provided news that Herman Husbands had communicated with other "Regulators," and almost 300 men were ready to march upon New Bern, but they stopped at Haw River. The Governor and Executive Council agreed to finish the line of entrenchment around New Bern.

On March 18-19, 1771, the Executive Council met in the Council Chamber in New Bern. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- Robert Palmer
- Martin Howard
- Samuel Cornell

Hassell, Palmer, Howard, and Cornell were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Governor William Tryon presented a letter from one Regulator to another laying out some of their agenda. The Governor and Executive Council agreed to raise a large group of militia and to march against the Regulators with all expedition.

Associate Justices Maurice Moore and Richard Henderson presented their letter explaining that they believed it too dangerous for them to convene their courts. Governor William Tryon agreed.

On 3/19, Governor William Tryon presented a letter from Richard Henderson. He has enough evidence to try several alleged counterfeiters and suggests doing so at a special Court of Oyer & Terminer to be held at Oxford in Granville County. The Governor and Executive Council agreed.

On April 5th (Friday), April 15th (Monday), April 17th (Wednesday), April 18th (Thursday), and April 19th (Friday) of 1771, the Executive Council met in the Council Chamber in the new "Palace" in New Bern. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- Robert Palmer
- Samuel Cornell

Lewis Henry De Rosset arrived on 4/17.

Hassell, Palmer, Cornell, and De Rosset were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

The Governor and Executive Council agreed to make out charters for Surry County and Guilford County, and to allow their inhabitants to vote for members of the upcoming General Assembly.

On 4/15, the Governor and Executive Council addressed Land Patent/Warrant issues and requests for resurveys.

On 4/17, the Governor and Executive Council issued a proclamation for civil officials to help Capt. Thomas Heyward to recruit able-bodied seamen to help patrol the coast.

On 4/19, the Governor and Executive Council agreed to prorogue the General Assembly until October 10th.

On June 29, 1771, the Executive Council met in the Council Chamber in the "Palace" in New Bern. Those present were:
- Gov. William Tryon
- James Hassell
- John Rutherfurd
- Lewis Henry De Rosset
- Robert Palmer
- Martin Howard
- Samuel Cornell

Hassell, Rutherfurd, De Rosset, Howard, and Cornell were identified as Members of His Majesty's Council.

Sir Nathaniel Duckenfield of England alleged that he is higher in rank than any Member of His Majesty's Council. The Governor and Executive Council argued otherwise.

Lt. Cotton of the 31st Regiment of Foot from West Florida arrived and asked for barracks, food, utensils as directed by Parliament for him to recruit new men from North Carolina.

Governor William Tryon informed the Executive Council that he had been re-assigned to become the next governor of New York. He advised them that he plans to depart tomorrow and leaves the Great Seal in care of James Hassell.

If more information comes available it will be added herein.

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