South Carolina Education - Anderson County

Year County Established

County Webpage Herein

County Seat Webpage Herein

1826

Anderson County

Anderson
 

On December 19, 1827, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of The Friendly Library Society of Pendleton, with assets up to $5,000 authorized (Section 6). In the same Act, they incorporated the Pendleton Female Academy, and named five (5) trustees (Section 9).

The Pendleton District was abolished in 1826, and the town of Anderson was now the county seat of the Anderson District, and the town of Pendleton was also in the Anderson District.

On December 17, 1831, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Verennes Academy of Anderson, and authorized assets up to $10,000.
On December 17, 1834, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Pendleton Manual Labor School, and authorized assets up to $10,000.
On December 19, 1835, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Anderson Male Academy and the Anderson Female Academy in the village of Anderson, and authorized assets up to $10,000 (Section XIX). In Section XXXIII of the same Act, they authorized the former Varennes Academy to vest their lands and property to the Anderson Male and Female Academies. They also authorized the sale of public buildings to also be vested in these two academies.
On December 21, 1839, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Calhoun Academy in the Anderson District, named six (6) trustees, and authorized assets up to $10,000 (Section XXII).
On December 20, 1842, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the re-incorporation of the Pendleton Female Academy in the Anderson District for an additional fourteen (14) years.

President of Triennial Southern, South Carolina Baptist Conventions. Johnson Female University founded here in 1848 as Johnson Female Seminary was named for him because of his support for female education. From 1853 to 1858, while Chancellor of this institution, he lived in the house at the south end of this street. His grave is in First Baptist Churchyard.

[Note, see 1852 below for when this university was incorporated.]

On December 19, 1849, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the re-incorporation of the Anderson Male and Female Academies of the Anderson District, extending their charter for an additional fourteen (14) years (Section X).

This site, on a lot donated by Dr. George Brown, was the location of a school for more than a century, Belton Academy, a private school with a classical curriculum, opened ca. 1851 as the town grew up around the new railroad junction. Brown's nephew, Dr. William Carroll Brown, was the academy's first professor. The academy stayed open during the Civil war but became a public school after it. A new frame two-story for grades 1-10 was built here in 1893.

The enrollment in Belton's schools grew rapidly after Belton Mill opened in 1899, and trustees approved this two-story brick school, called Central School, for grades 1-10. built in 1908, it was designed by Anderson architect Joseph H. Casey. In 1922, when a new Belton High School was built, this school became Central Grammar School, for grades 1-6. It closed in 1973, was sold to the town of Belton, and was renovated and rededicated as Belton City Hall in 1976.

On December 16, 1852, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Johnson Female University in the town of Anderson Court House in the Anderson District, named thirty-one (31) trustees, and chartered the university for twenty-one (21) years.
On December 20, 1853, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the renewal of the charter for the Pendleton Academy.
On December 19, 1855, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Williamston Male Academy (Sections I & II).

Three educational institutions have been in this immediate area: Johnson Female University (1856-63) named for William Bullein Johnson; the Carolina Collegiate Institute (about 1866-90) under W. J. Ligon; and Patrick Military Institute (1887-1900), J. B. Patrick, founder. A Confederate Treasury branch was located here in 1865, and University Hospital in the 1920s.

On December 21, 1858, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Williamston Male Academy in the Anderson District, named five (5) trustees, and authorized assets up to $20,000 (Sections II & III).

The one-room frame public school organized shortly after the Civil War, housed 76 students and 1 teacher by 1870. The school term lasted 1 month and 10 days. Jane Harris Hunter, founder of the Phillis Wheatley centers for working girls, attended the school for 3 years. She wrote the book, A Nickel and a Prayer. Vance Street is named after the family of Rev. Augustus Thomas Vance, who served as the school trustee.

This college was founded Feb. 12, 1872, by the Reverend Samuel Lander, D.D., Methodist minister. On this site stood the college building until 1939. The school was removed to Greenwood, S.C., Sept. 27, 1904, becoming Lander College, in honor of the founder, who died July 14, 1904. From an humble beginning there arose here a Christian institution of expanding influence, keeping faith with its motto: Puritas et Scientia.

[Note - In 1904, this college was moved to Greenwood County and became Lander College.]

On February 15, 1872, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to renew the charter of the Pendleton Male Academy indefinitely, or until the charter gets repealed by the legislature.
On March 17, 1874, the South Carolina General Assembly passed a Joint Resolution for the election of three Special Trustees to take complete control over the Greeley Institute of Anderson County and to elect one teacher and two assistant teachers.
On June 8, 1877, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to prevent the sale of spirituous liquors within three (3) miles of Williamston Female College in Anderson County.
On December 15, 1885, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish a new special school district in Anderson County, to be known as the Slabtown School District with the Slabtown Academy at its center, and authorized voters to decide upon an additional special school tax not to exceed two (2) mills on real and personal property. On December 24, 1889, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to repeal the Act of 12/15/1885, effective on January 1, 1891 - reason not provided. On December 24, 1890, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to delay the repeal until November 1, 1891.
On December 20, 1888, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish a new special school district, to be known as the Piedmont Graded School District, in the town of Piedmont in Greenville County, with the school district to exist in both Greenville and Anderson counties, and named three (3) trustees.
On December 23, 1891, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to prohibit the manufacture and sale of domestic wines, or of any spirituous, malt or intoxicating liquors or bitters, within five miles of the Walker McElmoyle Graded School, in Anderson County.

On December 24, 1891, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the Anderson County Commissioners to issue bonds up to $100,000 for the erection of suitable buildings for the South Carolina Industrial and Winthrop Normal College, if the school is to be located in Anderson County. Also on December 24, 1891, the South Carolina General Assembly passed another Act to authorize the City Council of Anderson to issue bonds up to $138,000 for securing the location of the South Carolina Industrial and Winthrop Normal College in said town of Anderson.

[Note - the South Carolina Industrial and Winthrop Normal College was NOT built in Anderson County. It was built in York County at Rock Hill.]

On January 5, 1895, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish a new special school district in the city of Anderson, in Anderson County, named nine (9) trustees, authorized voters to decide upon an additional special school tax not to exceed two (2) mills on real and personal property in the first year, up to three (3) mills each year thereafter. Voters also to decide upon issuing bonds up to $20,000 to buy property, erect and equip school buildings for said graded schools.
On March 9, 1896, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the County Board of Examiners in Anderson County to hold a County Teachers' Normal School for three weeks in the summer of 1896. May use $150 from the county school fund, plus $200 already appropriated.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Honea Path is the smallest town of the fourteen South Carolina communities with libraries funded by the Andrew Carnegie Foundation. Dr. John Wright, Mayor John Humbert, and Miss Jennie Erwin were leaders in obtaining the $5000 grant. The Honea Path Library Association was established in 1907 and the library opened in 1908. It was renamed the Jennie Erwin Library in 1958, when it became part of the Anderson County Library System.

This area was a hub of African-American life from the late-19th to mid-20th centuries. Anderson County Training School, built ca. 1922 as a Rosenwald school, closed in 1954 under the equalization program for black and white schools. It burned in the 1960s. The agricultural building is now a community center. The Faith Cabin Library, built ca. 1935 by a program to give black schools their own libraries, is one of only two such libraries still standing in S.C.

A frame store built nearby by Benjamin Horace Keese (1881-1975) and long known as the “Keese Barn” was a favorite gathering place for many years. Built ca. 1900 as a grocery store, it was later expanded and served as a cafe and antiques store/auction house. In 2003 Clemson University architecture students dismantled the Keese Barn and reused its historic materials to build the Memorial Block, to honor the store and its significance in Pendleton.

 


© 2016 - J.D. Lewis - PO Box 1188 - Little River, SC 29566 - All Rights Reserved