South Carolina Education - Charleston County

Year County Established

County Webpage Herein

County Seat Webpage Herein

1785-1791 (Abolished);
1800 (Re-established)

Charleston County

Charleston
In 1698, the first library in what became South Carolina was established in Charlestown. On November 16, 1700, the General Assembly passed an Act to ensure that "the Provincial Library" was managed and maintained appropriately. For a considerable time, this library was maintained in the St. Philip's Parish church in Charlestown.
On April 8, 1710, Governor Edward Tynte signed the first known Act to create a Free School in what soon became South Carolina. This first Act of 1710 was ultimately repealed and replaced by another Act entitled "An Act for a Free School in Charlestown," passed on December 12, 1712 by Governor Charles Craven.
On June 7, 1712, the South Carolina General Assembly passed two Acts. The first Act named John Douglas as the School Master for the Grammar School in Charlestown, and named Benjamin Dennis as the School Master for the school in St. James, Goose Creek Parish. The second Act established the Church of England as the official religion for South Carolina, and it made it official that the Provincial Library was to be maintained within the St. Philip's, Charlestown Parish Church.
On April 9, 1734, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to define the salaries for a School Master, an Usher, and a Writing Master at the Free School in Charlestown. The School Master was provided £100 per year, and the other two were provided £50 per year.
On May 17, 1751, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the South Carolina Society in Charlestown, and authorized assets up to £500 per year. This group had been organized in 1737 to help orphans and the indigent. They funded a Free School in 1769.
On May 8, 1754, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Charlestown Library Society, which had been launched in 1748. This Act authorized the society to build and maintain a new library and a new academy in Charlestown.
On August 23, 1769, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Fellowship Society in Charleston and authorized assets up to £500. The society had been founded in 1762 to help distressed persons, including lunatics.
On March 19, 1785, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the construction and management of three new colleges in the state - one at Winnsborough, one at Charleston, and one at Cambridge in the Ninety-Six District.
On December 21, 1798, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the St. Andrew's Society. This organization was authorized to build and manage a school for orphans and poor children in the town of Charleston.
On December 21, 1799, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize escheated property to be given to various societies across the state, including the escheated property of St. Philip's & St. Michael's Parish to be given to the orphan house in Charleston.
On December 21, 1804, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to extend the charter of the St. Andrew's Society for fourteen (14) years, and authorized assets up to $80,000. On December 13, 1817, the South Carolina General Assembly passed another Act extending the charter.

On December 14, 1805, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Pineville Academy, named five (5) trustees, and authorized assets up to $5,000, in the community of Pineville. On December 13, 1817, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to give escheated lands in St. Stephen's Parish to the Pineville Academy, and named five (5) trustees of the academy.

At the time of its incorporation, Pineville Academy was in the Charleston District. In 1882, it was then in the newly-established Berkeley County.

On December 19, 1809, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Mount Pleasant Academy, naming eight (8) trustees and authorizing assets up to $10,000. The trustees were authorized to take over the legacy of Elizabeth Fleming, who had bequeathed her assets in 1775 to build a school for the poor.
Also on December 19, 1809, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which amended the earlier Act of August 23, 1769 (above) concerning the Fellowship Society to authorize the education of orphan children, with assets increased to $15,000.
On December 20, 1810, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Philharmonic Society, and named nine (9) members thereof. One source asserts this group flourished in Charleston from 1809 to 1814.
On December 21, 1811, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the Charleston Orphan House to select one student each year to have a full sholarship to the South Carolina College in Columbia.
On December 21, 1814, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of The Literary and Philosophical Society of South Carolina in Charleston. Seven (7) officers and members of said society were named.
On December 18, 1818, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Ladies Society Charity School in Charleston, with assets authorized up to $5,000. Within the same Act, the South Carolina General Assembly incorporated the Pineville Library Society.
On December 20, 1821, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the South Carolina Academy of Fine Arts in Charleston, with assets up to $10,000 authorized. The charter was approved for twenty-one (21) years. On the same date, the Genral Assembly passed another Act, which included the authorization for the South Carolina Academy of Fine Arts to raise $10,000 via a lottery (Section XXI).
On December 21, 1822, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Ramsay Library and Debating Society in Charleston, with assets of $10,000 and a charter for fourteen (14) years authorized (Section XIII). Five (5) members were named. In the same Act, The South Carolina Academy of Fine Arts and the Literary and Philosophical Society of South Carolina were authorized to raise $20,000 via a lottery (Section XXII).
On December 20, 1823, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to vest all escheated property within the parishes of St. Philip's and St. Michael's, up to $30,000 in value, in the College of Charleston. On the same day, the South Carolina General Assembly passed another Act, which included the incorporation of the Philosophical and Classical Seminary of Charleston (Section XIX) for the teaching and promotion of literature and of the liberal arts and sciences. In the same Act, the South Carolina General Assembly incorporated the Medical Society to establish a medical school in Charleston (Section XXXV).,
On December 18, 1824, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Charleston Apprentices's Library Society with assets up to $10,000 authorized (Section I).
On December 20, 1825, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Charleston Medical Society of Emulation, with assets up to $10,000 authorized (Section XIII).
On December 20, 1826, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which authorized the South Carolina Society to erect and support any such school or schools, or other seminaries of education, as they may deem necessary and proper; and to appropriate therefor such sum or sums of money as may hereafter accrue or be vested in them, as may by them be deemed necessary (Section XXIII).
On December 19, 1827, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Washington Library Society in Charleston, and authorized assets up to $10,000 (Section 3). In the same Act, they re-incorporated the Franklin Library Society of Charleston for an additional fourteen (14) years (Section V). On the same date, the General Assembly passed another Act concerning the Ludlam School Fund.
On December 20, 1828, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which authorized the Fellowship Society of Charleston to erect and manage such schools or seminaries as they deemed appropriate (Secton VII).
On December 18, 1829, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of The Trinitarian Universalist and Library Society of Charleston, with assets up to $5,000 authorized.
On December 17, 1831, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Medical College of South Carolina in Charleston. On December 20, 1832, the South Carolina General Assembly passed another Act to incorporate the Trustees of the Medical College of South Carolina in Charleston, named eleven (11) trustees, named six (6) professors, and authorized assets up to $60,000. This Act did not explain the earlier Act of 1831. On December 19, 1833, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the Medical College to issue licenses to practice medicine and surgery, and to grant licences to apothecaries to vend drugs and medicines
On December 20, 1837, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the James Island Library Society (Section V). In Section XXXV of the same Act, they incorporated the South Carolina Academy of Art and Design in Charleston, with assets up to $5,000 authorized and a charter for thirty (30) years.
Also on December 20, 1837, the South Carolina General Assembly passed another Act to re-organize the College of Charleston. The college transferred all real estate to the City of Charleston, with a perpetual right to use said property. Redefined the number and responsibilities of the trustees.
On December 18, 1840, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the re-incorporation of the Charleston Apprentices' Library Society for a term of fourteen (14) years.
On December 20, 1842, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the establishment of the Military School at the Citadel in Charleston with an appropriation of $16,000 annually for said school. On December 19, 1843, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which added the Governor to the Board of Visitors for the Military Schools.
On December 18, 1844, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Mercantile Library Society in Charleston for a term of fourteen (14) years, with assets up to $10,000 authorized.
On December 18, 1846, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Ladies' Charity School in Charleston for a period of fourteen (14) years, with assets up to $20,000 authorized (Sections IX and X).
On December 19, 1848, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the Board of Commissioners of Free Schools for the Parishes of St. Philip and St. Michael to levy and collect taxes such that school buildings can be constructed in Charleston.
Also on December 19, 1848, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of The Female Missionary and Education Society of the First Baptist Church in Charleston. Their charter was for fourteen (14) years, and they were authorized assets up to $20,000.
On December 20, 1850, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the South Carolina Institute for the Promotion of Art, Mechanical Ingenuity and Industry in Charleston, named seventeen (17) officers and members, and authorized assets up to $50,000 (Section X).
On December 21, 1854, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the Orphan House of Charleston to select two (2) children every two years to be educated at the Military Academies of the State at the expense of the State.
Als on December 21, 1854, the South Carolina General Assembly passed another Act, which included the renewal of the charter for the Medical College of the State of South Carolina (Section III).
On December 20, 1856, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the Commissioners of Free Schools of the parishes of St. Philip's and St. Michael's to raise a fund for the building of free school houses via the levy and collection of a special tax. On December 21, 1857, the General Assembly passed an Act authorizing the Commissioners to increase the tax to thirty (30) percent upon the general tax, to be levied upon the property and inhabitants within the said Parishes.
On December 21, 1857, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish a "Normal School" in St. Philip's & St. Michael's Parish within the city of Charleston, with the State providing matching funds after the citizens subscribe $10,000. State to provide $5,000 each year thereafter for five years, again, after the citizens subscribe that amount as well. Said Normal School, after being built, will accept, free of charge, up to fifteen (15) female pupils per congressional district for the purpose of being trained as teachers.
Also on December 21, 1857, the South Carolina General Assembly passed another Act, which included the incorporation of The Elliott Society of Natural History in Charleston, and authorized assets up to $50,000 (Sections I & II). Section VI of the same Act provides a renewal of the charter for the Apprentices' Library Society of Charleston.
On January 28, 1861, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to re-identify the two separate military academies, now known as the "Arsenal Academy," and the "Citadel Academy," respectively, shall retain the same distinctive titles, but they shall together constitute and be entitled "The South Carolina Military Academy."
On December 21, 1861, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Palmetto Lyceum in Charleston, named six (6) officers, authorized assets up to $10,000, and chartered the corporation for fourteen (14) years.
On December 14, 1866, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Charleston Commerical College, named four (4) associates, and chartered the college for twenty-one (21) years.
On December 20, 1866, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the Commissioners of Free Schools for the Parishes of St. Philip's and St. Michael's to organize and establish an Evening Free School in the city of Charleston, for the instruction of apprentices and youths engaged in mechanical, mercantile and other useful pursuits or occupations. May levy a tax, not to exceed 15% to pay for said school.

Laing School located here from 1868 to 1953 was founded in 1866 by Cornelia Hancock, a Quaker who had served as a nurse with the Union Army during the Civil War. First housed in Mount Pleasant Presbyterian Church, Laing Industrial School was named for Henry M. Laing of the Friends Association for the Aid and Elevation of the Freedmen. The 1868 school destroyed by the Charleston Earthquake of 1886 was replaced by a school which stood here until 1954.

Early instruction at Laing with its motto “Try to Excel” combined academics with instruction in industrial, farming and homemaking skills. A new Laing Elementary opened at King and Greenwich Streets in 1945; the high school remained here until a new Laing High opened on U.S. Hwy. 17 North in 1953. Laing High closed in 1970 with the desegregation of county schools. That building later housed Laing Middle School when it opened in 1974.

On January 19, 1869, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act for the State to take ownership of the existing Shaw Orphan Asylum in Charleston and rename it to the State Orphan Asylum and make it free to all orphans within the State, within the limits of its capacity. $5,000 per year was appropriated for this asylum. On February 11, 1871, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the Trustees to bind out orphan children resident therein as apprentices, provided the orphan children received a "good common school education."
On February 26, 1869, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Amateur Literary and Fraternal Association in Charleston, named six (6) members, authorized assets up to $50,000, and chartered the association for fourteen (14) years.
On January 8, 1872, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Young Men's Africanus Debating Club in Charleston, named nine (9) members, authorized assets up to $25,000, and chartered the club for fifteen (15) years.
On February 15, 1872, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Wallingford Presbyterian Church and Academy in Charleston, named eight (8) trustees, authorized assets up to $200,000, and chartered the corporation indefinitely, or until repealed by the legislature. On December 23, 1886, the South Carolina General Assembly passed another Act about the Wallingford Presbyterian Church and Academy in Charleston amending the Act of 2/15/1872 about property and powers of the corporation.

“The Parsonage,” the home of Rev. James B. Middleton (1839-1918), stood here at 5 Short Court (now President’s Place) until 1916. Middleton and his siblings, born slaves, were taught to read and write by their father, Rev. James C. Middleton (1790-1889). After the Civil War the elder Middleton, his son Rev. Abram Middleton (1827-1901), and Rev. James B. Middleton organized and served as pastors of many Methodist churches in the lowcountry.

This house, the home of the Frazer and Izard families, was built at 7 Short Court (now President’s Place) by 1872. Anna Eliza Izard (1850-1945), niece of Revs. James B. and Abram Middleton, was a graduate of the Avery Normal Institute and taught school here for many years. Mamie Garvin Fields (1888-1987), a Middleton descendant, described life at 5 & 7 Short Court in Lemon Swamp and Other Places (1983).

On March 5, 1872, the South Carolina Genral Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Charleston Joint Stock Company, which was required to pay $2,000 annually to the State Treasurer for the benefit of the State Orphan Asylum in Charleston. This annual payment was a condition for their existence.
On February 22, 1873, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to revive and amend the charter of the Apprentices' Library Society of Charleston, and to rename said society to the Apprentices' and Minors' Library Society.
On February 27, 1873, the South Carolina General Assembly passed a Joint Resolution to instruct the Trustees of the State Orphan Asylum in Charleston to advertise for proposals from the various cities, towns, and Counties of the State, for a site, and building, for an Orphan Asylum, at a cost not to exceed the sum of twenty thousand dollars.
On November 25, 1873, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish a House of Refuge and Industrial School in Columbia and in Charleston for the care, correction, education and instruction of juvenile offenders of the law and peace of the city. This Act specified that these institutions were to be funded with local money and not via the State legislature.
On March 14, 1874, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the Apprentices' and Minors' Library Society of Charleston to merge with the Charleston Library Society, and the final name to remain as the Charleston Library Society. On February 8, 1875, the South Carolina General Assembly passed a Joint Resolution to give back property that was seized due to failure to pay property tax of the Charleston Library Society. In this Joint Resolution, it was also decreed that all property of the Charleston Library Society, including the property formerly owned by the Apprentices' and Minors' Library Society shall no longer be required to pay property taxes.
On March 9, 1875, the South Carolina General Assembly passed a Joint Resolution directing the Trustees of the State Orphan Asylum in Charleston to move the institution from Charleston to Columbia. From all available evidence, this never happened, and the orphanage remained in Charleston.
On March 24, 1875, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the German School Association of Charleston, named fifteen (15) associates, authorized assets up to $9,000, and may increase their capital stock to as much as $100,000 if necessary.
On March 1, 1878, the South Carolina General Assembly passed a Joint Resolution, which authorized the City of Charleston to seek out loans to help pay for the Free Public Schools because of an interval of tax collection that was caused by a recent Constitutional Amendment. On December 20, 1878, they passed another Joint Resolution of a similar nature.
On December 24, 1878, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the vestry of the St. Thomas & St. Dennis Parish to receive money bequeathed to them by Richard Beresford and use said funds for supporting and maintaining the education of poor children of the parish.
Also on December 24, 1878, the South Carolina General Assembly passed another Act to renew and revive the charter for the Medical College of South Carolina for an additional twenty-one (21) years.
On December 23, 1879, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to provide additional annual compensation for extensive travel to the School Commissioner of Charleston County.
On December 17, 1881, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the management of the High School of Charleston, to increase the amount of investment from $1,000 to $4,000 annually, and authorized assets up to $300,000. On December 19, 1887, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the Act of 12/17/1871 to redefine the makeup of the trustees, and how to fill vacancies among the trustes.
Also on December 17, 1881, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the charter of the Medical College of South Carolina in Charleston to permit the Trustees to establish a Department of Pharmacy, and that all instructors for said department to always be nominated by the Pharmaceutical Association of South Carolina.
On December 20, 1881, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the charter of the College of Charleston and redefined the Board of Trustees with new terms of office, and how to elect new trustees when a vacancy occurs.
On January 31, 1882, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to change the name of “The Orphan Home and School Association of the Church of the Holy Communion” to “The Holy Communion Church Institute of Charleston" Click Here to see their current website and history.
Also on January 31, 1882, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the School Commissioners of the City of Charleston to complete and furnish the school on Friend Street with funds provided by a new special tax not to exceed one-half (1/2) mill on real and personal property.

Also on January 31, 1882, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to re-open the South Carolina Military Academy in Charleston after the west wing had been significantly damaged. $10,000 was appropriated for the next two years to pay for the repairs. This Act also mandated that the Military Academy was now a part of the University of South Carolina system.

The Union Army had seized the Military Academy in February of 1865 and a garrison remained there until 1879. On January 29, 1882, the Secretary of War ordered the commanding officer of the federal Military District of South Carolina to evacuate the Citadel. On October 2, 1882 one hundred eighty-nine (189) cadets reported to the re-opened Citadel. Colonel John P. Thomas, Class of 1851, who had headed the Arsenal Academy during the American Civil War, was appointed Superintendent.

On February 4, 1882, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to create a Museum of Natural History in Charleston, and authorized assets up to $20,000. The Act also specified that the museum be open to the public free of charge.
On December 21, 1882, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to reorganize the School Board of the City of Charleston, and to authorize them to select meritorious students to be given a free education at the High School, and upon graduation from the High School they may receive a free education at the College of Charleston. The new School Board may also determine which students are entitled to represent the County of Charleston with a scholarship to either branch of the State University.
On December 23, 1882, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish the South Carolina Training School for Nurses at Charleston, named thirteen (13) trustees, and authorized assets up to $100,000.
On December 21, 1883, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to fix the number of School Commissioners in the City of Charleston to two (2), both to be appointed by the Governor.
On December 24, 1883, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to renew and extend the charter of the Amateur Literary and Fraternal Association of Charleston for an additional twenty (20) years.
On December 22, 1886, the South Carolina General Assembly passed a Joint Resolution to authorize $2,770.50 for repairs to the South Carolina Military Academy at Charleston, aka the Citadel, due to serious damages caused by the 7.5 magnitude earthquake of August 31, 1886. On the same date, they also passed an Act to authorize the City Board of School Commissioners in Charleston to use special tax funds collected for a new school instead for the repairs of existing schools necessitated by the earthquake of August 31, 1886.
On December 22, 1888, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to appropriate $57,250 provided by the U.S. Government for rent of the South Carolina Military Academy, aka the Citadel, and to pay for repairs to the west wing caused by a fire while the U.S. Army occupied the Citadel during the American Civil War. On December 23, 1889, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the Act of 12/22/1888, by appointing the Governor, the Attorney General, and the Comptroller General as a commission to oversee the repairs to the Citadel.
On December 23, 1890, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to reorganize the University of South Carolina into three branches: the South Carolina College in Columbia and Claflin College in Orangeburg - both under one Board of Trustees, and the South Carolina Military Academy (the Citadel) in Charleston under a Board of Visitors. The Experimental Station and the Mechanical Department connected with the University of South Carolina are to be transferred to the Clemson Agricultural College as of July 1, 1891.
On December 24, 1890, the South Carolina General Assembly passed a Joint Resolution directing the Board of Visitors of the South Carolina Military Academy (aka The Citadel) to apply to the U.S. Department of War for the issue of ordnance and ordnance stores, under Section 1225 of the Revised Statutes of the United States, for the use of the said Academy; and that the sureties upon the bond required in cases for the care and safe keeping thereof and for the return of the same when required will be indemnified in the premises by the State of South Carolina.

JENKINS ORPHANAGE

In 1891 the Reverend Daniel J. Jenkins established a home and school for poor, black orphans and for children of poor, distressed and disabled parents. It was his desire "to train the minds and hands of young, black boys and girls so that they could better equip themselves to be productive." Originally located at 660 King Street, in 1885 it was removed here to the Marine Hospital to make space for an enrollment that soon reached 536.

During its history the orphange operated a 100 acre farm, a print shop and a shoe repair shop. It became most famous for the display of musical talent in the orphanage bands that travelled throughout the country.

Today Jenkins Orphange is located on Azalea Drive in North Charleston.

On December 11, 1891, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to regulate the discharge of the matriculation obligation of beneficiary cadets of the South Carolina Military Academy (aka The Citadel) in Charleston.
On December 16, 1891, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to increase the number of Board of Visitors at the South Carolina Military Academy (aka The Citadel) in Charleston, by adding three (3) more ex officio members: the Superintendent of Education, the Chairman of the Military Committee of the Senate, and the Chairman of the Military Committee of the House of Representatives.
On December 22, 1891, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to document the new salary for the Charleston County School Commissioner to be $600 per annum, which is to include all travel expenses.

On December 23, 1891, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the charter of the Porter Academy in Charleston, SC, by authorizing assets up to $500,000.

[Note, this Author has not found the original charter within the Acts of South Carolina, but I may have just missed it. According to wikipedia.com, the Porter Academy was founded in 1867 by Rev./Dr. Anthony Toomer Porter, rector of Holy Communion Church, to educate children orphaned during the American Civil War - it was first established as the Holy Communion Church Institute.]

On December 15, 1892, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend Section 1026 of the General Statutes relating to the public schools in the city of Charleston, by reducing the payment to the City Treasurer of $1,000 per year to manage public school funds, down to $500 per year.
On December 21, 1894, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to require all Beneficiary Cadets of the South Carolina Military Academy (aka The Citadel) must teach for two (2) years after matriculation. Exceptions are clarified.
Also on December 21, 1894, the South Carolina General Assembly passed another Act to amend the charter of the Medical College of South Carolina, in Charleston, by authorizing a new Department of Dentistry. Professors and instructors in practical dentistry in such department may be nominated by the South Carolina State Dental Association and approved by the Board of Trustees and Faculty of the Medical College of the State of South Carolina.

 

Founded as a private school for elementary students in 1894 by Rev. John Dart at the corner of Bogard and Krake Streets, Charleston Normal and Industrial School was approved to become a public school for "colored" children in 1910 and opened at the 244 President Street site on January 3, 1911. In 1921, the school was renamed J.E. Burke Industrial School and by 1929, Burke was serving fifth through eleventh graders. In 1954, Burke and Avery merged as Burke High School and became accredited by the Southern Association of College and Secondary Schools; becoming one of the first high schools for African Americans to be accredited in the state.

Serving as the "Mother Ship" of all the City of Charleston high schools, Burke graciously received students of Avery, C.A. Brown, Rivers, the High School of Charleston, and Immaculate Conception School, as each closed, leaving Burke High as the only high school on the peninsula. Over the past four generations, Burke High School has graduated thousands of African American students with academic and trade preparation to stand equal and surpass many of the "privileged" children at state and national universities, including Ivy League colleges. Burke also produced many successful entrepreneurs, educators, doctors, lawyers, religious leaders, military leaders, politicians, tradesmen and other contributing members of our society.

Burke High produced some of the best teachers and administrators who not only taught the academic content requirements, but who took the time to teach students responsibility, manners, accountability, self-control, good behavior; respect for country, self and others. They invested in the whole child.
We, stand tall with the support of our parents, administration, faculty, staff, alumni classes, sister schools, and the Burke High School Foundation in celebrating this 100th year milestone of being an academic institution for African American students.

Hail Dear old Burke School
We'll rally to thy call
And from thy classic halls...
onward we'll go
Mem...'ries will linger on
We'll defend and fight for thee
Thy praise we'll ever sing
All hail to thee
—–—
We dedicate this marker as a symbol of what
Burke has instilled in us
a sense of
pride...honor...courage...hope...and zeal
to be strong, achieving Bulldogs!
—–—

On March 2, 1897, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the charter for the College of Charleston by adding three more trustees, which must be elected by graduates of the said college.
Also on March 2, 1897, the South Carolina General Assembly passed a Joint Resolution to appoint a commission to include the Governor, Attorney-General, and Comptroller-General to adjudicate the claim made by Thomas J. Mackey for services alleged to have been rendered by him in the prosecution of the U.S.Government rental damages claim, under contract with the Board of Visitors of the South Carolina Military Academy.
On January 29, 1898, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to create a public school teacher's retirement fund in the city of Charleston.
On February 21, 1898, the South Carolina General Assembly passed and Act to better utilize the surplus of the annual school tax collected in Charleston County and repurpose those funds to help the City of Charleston public schools.
On June 29, 1898, the Charleston County Clerk of Court recorded the charter for the Charleston Normal and Industrial Institution in the city of Charleston, in Charleston County, and named eight (8) incorporators.

In 1898 Charleston County School District No. 11 bought this land from J. S. Hart and built a public school on the site soon after. School closed in the early 1920s.

On March 2, 1899, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to fix the number and to regulate the terms of office of the Boards of Trustees for the South Carolina College in Columbia, the Winthrop Normal and Industrial College of South Carolina in Rock Hill, and the Board of Visitors for the South Carolina Military Academy (aka The Citadel) in Charleston, and to limit the compensation thereof.
On March 6, 1899, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend Section 1115 (1048) of the General Statutes providing for at least one beneficiary cadet from each county to attend the newly-reopened South Carolina Military Academy (aka The Citadel), even new counties that get created.
On February 17, 1900, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend Section 1114 of the General Statutes to authorize the Board of Visitors of the South Carolina Military Academy (aka The Citadel) in Charleston to confer the degree known as Bachelor of Science on cadets.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

10-78 - JAMES SIMONS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL / DESEGREGATION OF CHARLESTON SCHOOLS

This school, built in 1919 and designed by local architects Benson & Barbot, was the fifth public elementary school in the city. It opened for the 1919-1920 school year with an enrollment of 600. In 1955 the Charleston Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) petitioned the Charleston school board to desegregate all public city schools, including this one.

In 1960 nine parents, with support from the NAACP, applied for their children’s transfer to four white schools, including James Simons Elementary School. Denied by the board and on appeal, they sued in federal court in 1962 and won their case the next year. On September 3, 1963, eleven black students entered this school and Memminger Elementary School and Charleston and Rivers High Schools.

10-47 - LINCOLNVILLE SCHOOL / LINCOLNVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Lincolnville School, the first public school for black students in this community, stood here from 1924 to 1953. Built at a cost of $6,100, it was one of more than 5000 schools in the South funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Foundation between 1917 and 1932. Four teachers taught grades 1-7 in a frame school with four classrooms and an auditorium, on a four-acre lot on Broad Street.

In 1953 Lincolnville School was covered with brick veneer and expanded to become Lincolnville Elementary School, with four classrooms, a library, and a cafeteria/auditorium. Students attended grades 1-7 there until Charleston County schools were desegregated in 1969.

 
 
 
 
 
 


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