South Carolina Education - Fairfield County

Year County Established

County Webpage Herein

County Seat Webpage Herein

1785

Fairfield County

Winnsboro
 
On February 13, 1777, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Mt. Sion Society. This organization was authorized to build and manage a public school in the Camden District. The location was soon thereafter to be named Winnsborough in the later named Fairfield County.

A social and benevolent group dedicated to the promotion of education, the Mt. Zion Society was organized in January 1777 at Charleston S.C. John Winn was its first president. By the 1780s the society had founded a school for boys in Winnsboro. Under the leadership of J.W. Hudson, Mt. Zion institute became an important educational force in ante-bellum South Carolina, it became a public school about 1878.

On March 19, 1785, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish three colleges, including one at Winnsborough. The name was to be Mount Sion College. 
On December 18, 1802, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Jefferson Monticello Society in the Fairfield District, and authorized assets up to $10,000.
On December 20, 1806, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Winnsborough Library Society and authorized assets up to $5,000.
On December 21, 1811, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Franklin Library Society of Fairfield District.
On December 18, 1818, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which authorized the trustees of the Monticello Academy of the Fairfield District to raise $1,000 via a lottery.
On December 18, 1824, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Fairfield Broad River Academy, and named seven (7) trustees, with assets up to $10,000 authorized (Section V).
On December 19, 1827, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the re-incorporation of the Jefferson Monticello Society for an additional fourteen (14) years.

Established in 1825 by the S.C. Baptist Convention, the Furman Academy and Theological Institution opened in Edgefield, 1826, moved to Sumter District, 1829-34, and to Fairfield 1837-1850. Chartered in 1830 as Furman University, it opened in Greenville, 1851, and for over a century, 1852-1958, occupied this site purchased from Vardry McBee. In the summer of 1958, Furman moved to a new campus six miles north of town.

[Note - As described, Furman Academy was originally in the Edgefield District. From 1829 to 1834, it was in the Sumter District. From 1837 to 1850, it was in the Fairfield District. Furman University moved to the Greenville District and opened in 1851. It has been in Greenville County ever since. The marker above is in Greenville County]

On December 18, 1840, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Furman Institute near Winnsboro in the Fairfield District, and authorized assets up to $20,000.

Around 1840 an academy was established at this site by John Feaster, a noted landowner of this area, for the education of female and male students. By 1842, both academy building and a boarding house (dormitory)had been erected. Mr. Feaster, appointed as trustees his sons, Andrew, Jacob, and John M. Feaster.

On December 17, 1863, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Blythewood Female Academy in the Fairfield District, named six (6) trustees, authorized assets up to $50,000, and chartered the academy for twenty-one (21) years (Section VII).

This grade school and normal institute for blacks was founded in 1869 during Reconstruction by the Northern Presbyterian Church. The Reverend Willard Richardson was principal. In 1880, one-hundred of its students were studying to be teachers and twenty others to enter the ministry. The school closed in 1888 to merge with Brainerd Institute in Chester. The site is located one block west.

Born in Fairfield County, this renowned black educator attended Fairfield Institute, 1878-1880, and won a scholarship to Howard University, from which he graduated in 1886. After graduate work at Johns Hopkins, Miller received his A.M. and L.L.D. degrees (1901 and 1903) and was for many years professor and dean at Howard. His writings on race problems were widely read and used in major universities.

On March 9, 1871, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to vest one hundred (100) acres of escheated land in the Ridgeway Academy, and authorized the trustees of said academy to sell the escheated land to raise money to build a school in Fairfield County.
On February 24, 1876, the South Carolina General Assembly passed a Act to amend the Act immediately above to remove all reference to the Ridgeway Academy and replace it with Township Eight Free School District. The existing academy is now a Free Public School and part of the State system.
On March 18, 1878, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to prohibit the sale of spirituous liquors within three miles of the Blythewood Female Seminary in Fairfield County.
On December 23, 1878, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish a special new school district in the town of Winnsboro, with the authority to levy and collect an additional special school tax of one and one-half (1-1/2) mills on real and personal property. On December 24, 1887, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the Act of 12/23/1878 by increasing the special tax up to two (2) mills.
On December 23, 1879, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish two new special school districts in Fairfield County. One new school district to be coterminous with the newly-established Township No. 15. The second new school district to have the Monticello Academy at its center (in Township No. 13), and including no more than five square miles. Both to vote on how much additional special school tax to be levied and collected.
On December 24, 1880, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the Act directly above (12/23/1879) by deleting the reference to Monticello Academy and redefining the school district's boundaries, and to authorize the voters to decide upon an additional special school tax up to three (3) mills on real and personal property.
On February 9, 1882, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish a new special school district in the town of Blackstock in both Fairfield and Chester counties, and authorized voters to decide upon an additional special school tax not to exceed two (2) mills on real and personal property.
On December 22, 1882, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish two new special school districts in Fairfield County, one on the east bank of the Little River just north of the Richland/Fairfield county line, the second school district in the town of Ridgeway, and authorized the voters in each district to decide upon an additional special school tax not to exceed two (2) mills on real and personal property. On December 24, 1883, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which amended the Act of 12/22/1882, by clarifying the boundaries of the school districts.
On December 22, 1885, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the Town Council of Winnsboro to issue bonds up to $7,500 in value to erect new buildings or repair and improve existing buildings of Mount Zion College in said town.
On December 22, 1886, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to enlarge the boundaries of School District No. 17 in Fairfield County and make two school districts thereof, one on each side of Crooked Run Creek, and they shall be respectively known as No. 17 and No. 18.
On December 23, 1886, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the Town Council of Winnsboro to issue additional bonds up to $1,500 in value for the purpose of rebuilding, repairing and improving Mount Zion College in said town.
On December 19, 1887, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize voters to decide upon an additional special school tax in School District No. 9 within Fairfield County, not to exceed one and a half (1-1/2) mills on real and personal property.
On December 24, 1887, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish three (3) new special school districts in Fairfield County, No. 19, No. 20, and No. 21, and authorized voters to decide upon an additional special tax not to exceed two (2) mills on real and personal property.
On December 24, 1890, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act authorizing the Town Council of Winnsboro to issue new bonds up to $7,000 to pay off the town's indebtedness, and to pay the Mount Zion Academy annually the sum of $600 for the exclusive support of the public schools within the corporate limits of said town of Winnsboro.
On January 26, 1899, the South Carolina General Assembly passed a Joint Resolution to authorize the Trustees of School District No. 16, in the town of Ridgeway in Fairfield County, to sell a certain lot of land, known as the Ridgeway High School lot, and to use the proceeds of such sale in aid of the erection of a public school building by the said town of Ridgeway.
On February 17, 1900, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to provide for the election of trustees, the management of public schools, and the disbursement of school funds in Special School District No. 14, in the town of Winnsboro in Fairfield County. Seven new trustees: one elected by the town, three elected by school district, three elected by Mt. Zion Society.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


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