South Carolina Education - Greenville County

Year County Established

County Webpage Herein

County Seat Webpage Herein

1786

Greenville County

Greenville
 
On December 20, 1820, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Greenville Academy, and named seven (7) trustees of said academy. The Act also authorized assets up to $5,000.
On December 21, 1822, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Fork Shoal Library Society in the Greenville District, with assets up to $10,000 and a charter for fourteen (14) years authorized (Section XI).
On December 17, 1831, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Fairfield Academy of Greenville. The Act also authorized assets up to $10,000.
On December 21, 1836, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Greenville Academies, and authorized assets up to $10,000. The charter was good for fourteen (14) years.
On December 21, 1839, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Greenville Library Society for a term of fourteen (14) years, and authorized assets up to $5,000 (Section XV).
On December 20, 1850, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Furman University in the town of Greenville Court House within the Greenville District, named twenty-five (25) trustees, authorized assets up to $300,000, and chartered the university for fourteen (14) years.

Established in 1825 by the S.C. Baptist Convention, the Furman Academy and Theological Institution opened in Edgefield, 1826, moved to Sumter District, 1829-34, and to Fairfield 1837-1850. Chartered in 1830 as Furman University, it opened in Greenville, 1851, and for over a century, 1852-1958, occupied this site purchased from Vardry McBee. In the summer of 1958, Furman moved to a new campus six miles north of town.

[Note - As described, Furman Academy was originally in the Edgefield District. From 1829 to 1834, it was in the Sumter District. From 1837 to 1850, it was in the Fairfield District. Furman University moved to the Greenville District and opened in 1851. It has been in Greenville County ever since.]

On December 16, 1851, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the renewal of the charter for the Greenville Male and Female Academies for an additional fourteen (14) years, and authorized assets up to $25,000.
On December 20, 1853, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of St. Mary's College, named five (5) trustees, and authorized assets up to $50,000. The Act does not state where this new college was located, but an extensive search online indicates that St. Mary's Catholic Church was established in Greenville, SC in 1852. It is most likely that St. Mary's College was intended to be formed at this location, but whether or not it truly materialized is not known to this Author. If anyone can shed light on this topic, all help would be greatly appreciated.
On December 21, 1854, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which authorized the trustees of the Greenville Academies to convey their land, and surrender their trust and charter to the trustees of the Furman University, and the trustees of the said university are authorized and empowered to accept the same, on the condition that they carry out the original trust in regard to the said Greenville Academies, and keep up, in all time to come, a male and female school, at or near Greenville Court House, where all the studies maybe pursued which are usually taught in male and female academies (Section XI).

Established in 1854 by the S.C. Baptist Convention, this institution opened as Greenville Baptist Female College in February 1856, on this site originally donated by Vardry McBee to the Greenville Academies. Its name was changed to Greenville Woman's College in 1914. It was coordinated with Furman University in 1933, merged with Furman in 1938, and moved in 1961 to the consolidated campus six miles north of town.

On December 20, 1856, the South Carolina General Assembly pased an Act, which included a renewal of the charter for the Fairview Academy of the Greenville District, and named three (3) current trustees (Section VIII).
On December 21, 1858, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in town of Greenville Court House in the Greenville District, named twenty-four (24) trustees, authorized assets up to $500,000, and chartered the Seminary for twenty-one (21) years (Section XVI).

In 1825, Wm. Bullein Johnson opened a subscription for a Baptist meetinghouse, which was soon built here. The 120 foot-square lot, which extended well into present McBee Ave., was given by Vardry McBee. After its organization in 1832, First Baptist Church occupied the building here until it moved to West McBee Ave. The church moved to its present location on Cleveland Street in 1974.

When Southern Baptist Theological Seminary was organized in 1859, the old Baptist church building once located here was divided into two classrooms and library for the school's use. First faculty was James Petigru Boyce, John A. Broadus, Basil Manly, Jr., and William Williams. Crawford H. Toy and William H. Whitsitt joined before the seminary moved to Louisville, Ky. in 1877.

On December 22, 1859, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Fairview Male and Female Schools in the Greenville District, named three (3) trustees, authorized assets up to $20,000, and chartered the schools for twenty-one (21) years (Section XIV).
On December 20, 1866, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to renew the charter of Furman University in the town of Greenville Court House for an additional thirty (30) years.
On March 1, 1878, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to exempt Furman University from paying property tax as long as the institution offers free tuition to citizens of the State.
On December 12, 1879, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate and charter the Inter-State Normal School at Greenville Court House in Greenville County, named twenty (20) members of the Board of Regents, and authorized assets up to $500,000. The Act also provided that 100 students are to be admitted with free tuition by promising to teach for two years within the State. One hundred students from other states can also be admitted for $3,000 per year in total, or at $30 per year per student.
On December 26, 1884, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Greenville Conservatory of Music in the City of Greenville Court House in Greenvill County, and authorized assets up to $50,000.
On December 26, 1885, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish a new special school district in the City of Greenville Court House in Greenville County, and authorized voters to decide upon an additional special school tax not to exceed two (2) mills on real and personal property. On December 20, 1893, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the 12/26/1885 Act, by increasing the special school tax from two (2) mills to three (3) mills on real and personal property. On February 21, 1898, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the Acts of 12/26/1885 and 12/20/1893, by requiring the special tax to be collected by the County Treasurer instead of formerly by the City Treasurer.

This early twentieth century suburb takes its name from Sans Souci, the nearby house and estate of Gov. Benjamin F. Perry (1805-1886). Perry, a prominent Unionist before the Civil War, was appointed provisional governor of S.C. by President Andrew Johnson in June 1865 and served until December 1865. In 1876-77 he built an ornate Second Empire house N of this location.

After B. F. Perry's death in 1886, the house was briefly a girl's school. His heirs sold the property in 1902 and it became the Sans Souci Country Club in 1905. The club moved to Byrd Blvd. and became the Greenville Country Club in 1924. The house burned in 1927. Residential and commercial development in this area from 1911 through World War II featured the name Sans Souci.

On December 19, 1887, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the City Council of Greenville Court House in Greenville County to issue bonds up to $18,000 for the purpose of purchasing more lots, to build new school houses, and to repair and refurnish existing free public schools.
On December 24, 1887, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish a new special school district, to be known as Greer's Graded School District, in the town of Greer's Depot, with said new school district to be in both Greenville and Spartanburg counties, named five (5) trustees, and authorized voters to decide upon a special school tax not to exceed two (2) mills on real and personal property. On December 20, 1888, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the Act of 12/24/1887, to clarify the boundaries of said district with the center being at the existing Greer's Academy.
On December 20, 1888, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish a new special school district, to be known as the Piedmont Graded School District, in the town of Piedmont in Greenville County, with the school district to exist in both Greenville and Anderson counties, and named three (3) trustees.
Also on December 20, 1888, the South Carolina General Assembly passed another Act to authorize the City Council of the city of Greenville to levy a tax of one-third of one (1/3) mill in each year for the next three years on all the real and personal property situate and being in the corporate limits of the city of Greenville for the purpose of paying for the seating, furnishing, and equipping the two new public school buildings in said city.
On December 24, 1890, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act authorizing the City Council of the City of Greenville, in Greenville County, to issue bonds up to $7,000 for the purpose of purchasing one school house site, with or without buildings, erecting new ones, furnishing same and improving school house grounds for the free public schools of the City of Greenville. May also levy an additional tax to pay the interest on these bonds.
On December 18, 1891, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to prohibit the manufacture and the sale of spirituous liquors and malt liquors, wines, and bitters of which spirituous liquors form an ingredient, within five miles of the O'Neale High School in Greenville County.
On December 22, 1891, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to prohibit the manufacture or sale of spirituous liquors, or malt liquors, wines, bitters, or bitters of which spirituous liquors form an ingredient, within five miles of the Tigerville High School in Greenville County.

23-53 - CEDAR GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH / SIMPSONVILLE ROSENWALD SCHOOL

According to tradition, this African-American church was organized by Rev. Tom Jones shortly after the Civil War. It held its first services in a brush arbor, then built its first permanent church here. The congregation, with a membership of about 250, built a second frame sanctuary in 1938 at a cost of $3,000. It was covered in brick veneer in 1962. The present brick church was dedicated in 1986.

The Reedy River Baptist Association built a school for the African-American children of Simpsonville and other area communities here in 1891-92, on the present site of the church. In 1923-24 the Simpsonville Rosenwald School, an eight-room elementary and high school, was built nearby. One of about 500 schools in S.C. funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Foundation 1917-1932, it closed after the 1953-54 school year.

On December 24, 1892, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to create a new special school district from portions of Laurens County and Greenville County, to be known as the Princeton Graded School District, named six (6) trustees, and authorized voters to decide upon an additional special school tax not to exceed three (3) mills on real and personal property. On December 21, 1894, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to repeal the Act of 12/24/1892. Unexpended taxes are to be refunded to tax-payers. Reason for the repeal not given.
On October 28, 1895, the Greenville County Clerk of Court recorded the charter for the Presbyterian Female Seminary in the city of Greenville and identified $20,000 in capital stock.

Sterling High School stood ¾ mi. southeast of here and served generations of African Americans in Greenville. Founded in 1896 by Rev. D.M. Minus and called Greenville Academy, it was first located in west Greenville. It moved into a new two-story brick school nearby in 1902 and was then renamed Sterling Industrial College after Mrs. E.R. Sterling, who had financed Rev. Minus's education at Claflin University.

The school closed briefly but reopened in 1915 as Enoree High School, owned by the Enoree Baptist Assn. The Greenville Co. School District bought the school in 1929, made it the first black public high school in the county, and restored the name sterling. After it burned in Sept. 1967, classed moved to Greenville Jr. High. It closed after the 1969-70 school year.

On February 17, 1897, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to allow the School Trustees for the town of Greenville School District to borrow $1,000 in order to install a sewer system in all public schools in said school district. The Act also authorized an additional special school tax of one half (1/2) mill on all real and personal property to pay the interest on said loan, if necessary.
On February 16, 1898, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to renew and extend the charter of Furman University in the city of Greenville, in Greenville County, for an additional thirty (30) years. This Act also redefined the terms of office for trustees.
On April 29, 1898, the Greenville County Clerk of Court recorded the charter for Chicora College in the city of Greenville, in Greenville County, named fifteen (15) incorporators, and identified $10,000 in capital stock.
On December 28, 1898, the Greenville County Clerk of Court recorded the charter for the West Greenville Reading & Social Club in the city of Greenville, in Greenville County, and named five (5) incorporators.
On February 9, 1900, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the Trustees of School District No. 12D of Greenville County to use public school funds to assist in rebuilding the Friendship Church building, which had been recently been destroyed by a fire. The church had been used as a free public school for the past twenty-four (24) years.
 
 
 

Pepper School, established in 1914-15, was built on land donated "for the children of my community" by William A. Pepper (1829-1914). The school, with three teachers and about 75-100 students in grades 1-7 for much of its history, closed after the 1952-53 school year. The Augusta Road Ruritan Club bought the building in 1964, preserved it for the community, and meets there now.

The Fountain Inn Rosenwald School, also known as the Fountain Inn Colored School, was a complex of several buildings built here from 1928 to 1942. The first school, a frame seven-room elementary school for grades 1-7, was a Rosenwald school, one of 500 rural schools in S.C. funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Fund from 1917 to 1932. It was built in 1928-29 at a cost of $7,200.

The Fountain Inn Colored High School, a frame three-room high school for grades 8-11, was built in 1930. A frame teacherage was built in 1935 for principal Gerard A. Anderson, and by 1942 this complex included a library, gymnasium, and three new classrooms. The high school closed in 1954, and the elementary school closed in 1960. The 1935 teacherage is the only building standing; the rest were demolished in 2000.

23-56 - OLD PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH / OLD PILGRIM ROSENWALD SCHOOL

This church was founded in 1868 by black members of nearby Clear Spring Baptist Church who named their new church Pilgrim Baptist Church. Rev. John Abraham, their first pastor, held services in a brush arbor until a log church was built here. It was renamed Old Pilgrim Baptist Church in 1894. A frame church built here in 1907 was covered in brick veneer in 1962. The present brick church was built in 1983.

Old Pilgrim Rosenwald School, named for the church, was built in 1930. It was one of almost 500 schools in S.C. funded in part by the Julius Rosenwald Foundation from 1917 to 1932. Built at a cost of $3,800 with local funds raised by Henry Locke and trustees of Old Pilgrim Baptist Church, it operated 1930-1954 with three teachers, teaching as many as 83 elementary school students in grades 1-7.

 
 
 
 
 


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