South Carolina Education - Lexington County

Year County Established

County Webpage Herein

County Seat Webpage Herein

1785-1791 (Abolished);
1804-Present

Lexington County

Lexington
 
On December 20, 1821, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Lexington Library Society in the Lexington District (Section I).
On December 18, 1829, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Platt Springs Academy in the Lexington District, and authorized assets up to $5,000 (Section I.1). In Section VII of the same Act, they authorized all escheated property in the Lexington District to be vested in said Academy, up to a value of $5,000.

On December 20, 1832, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included the incorporation of the Theological Seminary of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of South Carolina, and authorized assets up to $10,000.

When founded in 1831, the Seminary was in the small town of Countsville along the Lexington and Newberry District boundary. Countsville was renamed to Pomaria in 1840. In 1834, the Seminary was moved to the county seat of Lexington Court House. In 1855, the Seminary was moved to the town of Newberry in the Newberry District, and in 1856 it was renamed to Newberry College.

The Lutheran Classical and Theological Seminary was located here from 1834 to 1855. The Synod of S.C. established a new seminary in 1831 in an effort to promote the education of Lutheran ministers in the Southeast. It opened in Pomaria, Newberry County, but plans were soon made to move to this site, then 1/2 mi. from the town of Lexington Court House.

The seminary opened here in 1834, with Dr. Ernest L. Hazelius (1777-1853), a native of Prussia who had come to America in 1800, as headmaster until 1851. The seminary, headmaster’s house (1833), and academic building (1838) are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The seminary moved to Newberry in 1855 and became Newberry College in 1856.

On December 21, 1836, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to increase the number of school commissioners from five (5) to twelve (12) in the Lexington District.
On December 16, 1851, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act, which included changing the name of The Theological Seminary of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of South Carolina to The Classical and Theological Seminary of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of South Carolina and Adjacent States (Section XII).
On December 21, 1857, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to increase the number of Commissioners of Free Schools for the Lexington District from twelve (12) to thirteen (13).
On February 9, 1882, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish a new special school district in the town of Leesville in Lexington County, and authorized voters to decide upon a new special school tax not to exceed two (2) mills on real and personal property. On December 21, 1883, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to reduce the size of the school district in the town of Leesville.
On December 24, 1885, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish a new special school district in Lexington County, to be known as the Martin School District with Mitchell Academy at its center, and authorized voters to decide upon an additional special school tax not to exceed three (3) mills on real and personal property. On December 23, 1886, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to amend the Act of 12/24/1885, which added Section 4 - the new school district will have two public schools - Mitchell Academy is to become Mitchell High School for white students plus a new school for colored students is to be built. All proceeds from the new special tax will benefit these two schools and no more.
On December 22, 1888, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to authorize the Lexington County Board of Examiners to completely redistrict all Lexington County public schools, with no more than two schools in each district - one for whites and one for colored.
On April 19, 1890, the Lexington County Clerk of Court issued a Charter to incorporate the Leesville Industrial Institute Company in the town of Leesville, in Lexington County, named eight (8) incorporators, and identified $5,000 in capital stock. The company's purpose was to give an English and classical education to youth.
On July 24, 1890, the Lexington County Clerk of Court issued a Charter to incorporate the Leesville College Company in the town of Leesville, in Lexington County, named four (4) incorporators, and identified $10,000 in capital stock. The company's purpose was toconduct a college for the education of white youth of both sexes. Two of the incorporators were the same men who were incorporators of the Leesville Industrial Institute Company directly above.
On December 16, 1891, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to incorporate the Palmetto Collegiate Institute in the town of Lexington, in Lexington County, named seven (7) trustees, and authorized assets up to $50,000.

32-37 - BATESBURG INSTITUTE

The Batesburg Institute opened here in 1893. Also called the Batesburg Collegiate Institute, it was created by the merger of the town’s Methodist and Baptist schools, founded in the 1880s. The Institute moved into the Baptist school, a one-story frame building later enlarged with a second story. W.J. Helms, its first principal, served here from 1893 to 1896, when the institute had more than 100 students.

Principals of the Institute from 1896 to 1911 inclueed D.W. Daniel, L.C. Perry, J.R.T. Major, and W.C. Martin. John Broadus Watson (1878-1958), who taught at the Batesburg Institute 1899-1900, was later a renowned psychologist and a pioneer in the field of behaviorism. The Batesburg Institute burned in 1911 and was replaced by the Batesburg Graded and High School, a new brick school on U.S. Highway 1, in 1912.

On December 20, 1893, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish a new special school district in the town of Swansea, in Lexington County, to be known as the Swansea School District, with all the rights, powers, privileges and liabilities as are provided for school districts by the General School Law of South Carolina approved December 24th, A. D. 1890.
On February 19, 1900, the South Carolina General Assembly passed an Act to establish a reformatory in connection with the State Penitentiary in the county of Lexington. Said reformatory to provide for the instruction of all male inmates in morals as well as useful labor. Must be segregated.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


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