The American Revolution in South Carolina

Eutaw Springs

September 8, 1781


Patriot Cdr:

Major General
Nathanael Greene
British Cdr:

Lt. Col. Alexander Stewart
Killed:

251
Killed:

85
Wounded:

367
Wounded:

351
Captured:

Unk
Captured:

430
Old District: 

Charles Town District
Present County:

Orangeburg County

Seven years of British determination to bring South Carolina to her knees met failure. The spirit that had long resisted royal edict and church canon, the fierce desire and indomitable will to be masters of their own destinies, and the dauntless courage that had carved a new way of life from a wilderness were again threatened by oppression; so, little difference was felt among nationalities and creeds, causing a unity to grow among the new world "peasants and shepherds" that shook the foundations of old regimes.

By mid-summer of 1781, the Continentals under Major General Nathanael Greene had gained virtual control of South Carolina. The retreating British, disillusioned and sick with summer heat, united forces under Lt. Col. Alexander Stewart at Orangeburgh and began their march to Charlestown. Early in September, the 2,300 well-equipped British camped in cool shade beside the gushing springs of Eutaw, little dreaming that a fairly large Patriot army was close upon their heels.

Major General Greene, hearing of General George Washington's plan to encircle and embarrass the British at Yorktown in Virginia, determined to prevent southern aid from reaching the beleaguered Lt. General Charles, Lord Cornwallis. Contingents under generals Marion, Pickens, Lee, and lieutenant-colonels William Washington, Hampton, among other South Carolina leaders, were called together, and reinforcements from other states joined them. These 2,092 poorly-equipped, underfed, and near-naked Americans camped on September 7th on the River Road at Burdell's Plantation, only seven miles from Eutaw Springs. Strategy for the ensuing attack is accredited to the genius of the dreaded "Swamp Fox," Brigadier General Francis Marion, who knew every foot of the Santee swamps and river.

Robert D. Bass asserted in his 1959 book, entitled, "Swamp Fox," that Major General Nathanael Greene gave command of all Continentals to NC Brigadier General Jethro Sumner, and command of all Militia to Brigadier General Francis Marion.

After organizing his army for attack, Major General Nathanael Greene moved down the Congaree Road to Burdell's Tavern, only seven (7) miles from his enemy. At 4 a.m. on September 8th, he marched from Burdell's, his army in four columns, each detailed to its place at Eutaw Springs. Lt. Col. William Henderson led the advance with the SC State Troops and Lt. Col. Henry Lee's Legion. Brigadier General Francis Marion came next with the Militia of North Carolina and South Carolina. Brigadier General Jethro Sumner followed with the Continentals, and Lt. Col. William Washington brought up the rear with his 3rd Regiment of Continental Dragoons (VA).

In his deployment, Brigadier General Francis Marion sent Brigadier General Andrew Pickens to the extreme left. In the center, he posted NC Col. Francois DeMalmedy and the Militia of North Carolina. And from his own Brigade, he formed the right wing. Lt. Col. William Henderson (SC) covered the left wing and Lt. Col. Henry Lee and his Legion (VA) covered the right wing of all State Troops and Militia units.

September 8th dawned fair and intensely hot, but the Patriots, on short rations and with little rest, advanced in early morning light toward the springs. At their approach the surprised British left their uneaten breakfast and quickly threw lines of battle across the road in a heavily-wooded area. Behind them in cleared fields stood a large brick home with a high-walled garden. The woods and waters of Eutaw Creek were on the north.

Lt. Col. Alexander Stewart quickly realized what was happening and he formed his troops in one line across the Congaree Road. On his extreme right, he posted Major John Majoribanks and a flank battalion behind a thicket a hundred paces in front of Eutaw Creek. In the center, he posted the 3rd Regiment of Guards and Lt. Col. John Harris Cruger's Loyalists, both under Cruger's command. On his left, he posted the 63rd Regiment of Foot and the 64th Regiment of Foot, their flank in air, but supported by Major John Coffin and his cavalry. He also posted Major Henry Sheridan and sharpshooters from the New York Volunteers in the exceedingly strong brick house of Patrick Roche, which stood in the field west of Eutaw Springs.

Heavy firing soon crackled and boomed through the shady woods. At first the center of the Patriot line caved in, but while opposing flanks were fighting separate battles, Major General Greene restored the center with the North Carolina Continentals. The whole British line then began to give, but Lt. Col. Alexander Stewart quickly pulled up his left-flank reserves, forcing the Patriots to retreat under thunderous fire. The encouraged British shouted, yelled, and rushed forward in disorder; whereupon Major General Greene (according to J. P. Petit) "brought in his strongest force: the Maryland and Virginia Continentals, Kirkwood's Delawares, and Lt. Colonel Washington's South Carolina [sic - Virginia] cavalry . . . with devastating effect."

Both the British and the Continentals were astonished to see Marion's Militiamen, steady, unfaltering, and advancing life veterans into the enemy's hottest fire. "The fire redoubled; our officers behaved with the greatest bravery, and the militia gained much honor by their firmness," Major General Greene later reported to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia. To Major General Baron von Steuben he wrote that "such conduct would have graced the veterans of the Great King of Prussia.

Brigadier General Francis Marion's Militia units fired seventeen (17) rounds - near the limit of their flintlocks endurance. Then, with ammunition exhausted, they retired in good order, leaving the fighting to Brigadier General Jethro Sumner's Continentals. "My Brigade behaved well," Marion later wrote to Lt. Col. Peter Horry.

The Continentals moved forward with spirit. As the Patriots advanced, the left of the British line fell back in disorder, and Lt. Col. Henry Lee, wheeling his infantry upon them, increased the enemy's confusion. In the center, Lt. Col. Cruger's line held, British regulars meeting Continentals in hand-to-hand fighting, bayonets meeting bayonets, and swords clashing on swords. But the confusion on the British left soon affected the center, and when the Marylanders delivered a terrific fire, the whole British line, except for Major Majoribanks flankers, sagged, faltered, and began retreating.

The British fled in every direction and the Patriots took over their camp. Only Major John Majoribanks, on the British right flank and pushed far back into the woods near Eutaw Creek, was able to hold his unit together. Major Henry Sheridan took hasty refuge in the brick home, Lt. Col. Alexander Stewart gathered some of his men beyond, and from this vantage they "picked off" many American officers and men.

Major General Nathanael Greene then sent Lt. Col. Washington's cavalry to deal with Major Majoribanks, but penetrating the woods with horses was too difficult, so Lt. Col. Washington tried to encircle and rout, thus exposing himself to dangerous fire. His horse was shot from under him, he himself was wounded, and his company practically ravaged. When a hand-to-hand fight developed, a British soldier poised his sword over the wounded Lt. Col. Washington, but Major Majoribanks saw this and gallantly turned it aside. Washington was now his prisoner.

In camp, eating the deserted breakfast, and feeling the battle was won, the hungry and thirsty Patriots began plundering the English stores of food, liquors, and equipment. Thoroughly enjoying themselves they ignored their leaders' warnings and commands. Major Majoribanks, realizing the disorder, fell upon them. Major Sheridan and Lt. Col. Stewart pounded at their right, and Major John Coffin came in from their left. The stunned Americans fought this impossible situation bravely, but they were quickly put to flight from the British camp.

After more than four hours of indecisive battle under a merciless sun both armies had had enough. Casualties were extremely high. "Blood ran ankle deep in places," and the strewn area of dead and dying was heart-breaking.

Major General Greene collected his wounded and returned to Burdell's Tavern. Lt. Col. Alexander Stewart remained the night at Eutaw Springs but hastily retreated the next day toward Charlestown, leaving behind many of his dead unburied and seventy of his seriously wounded. The gallant Major John Majoribanks, wounded and on his way to Moncks Corner, died in a slave cabin on Wantoot Plantation. He was buried beside the road, but when lake waters were to cover that area his remains were removed by the S.G.P.S.A. to their present resting place at the Eutaw Springs Battlefield memorial.

The total casualties came to 1,188, according to Rev. M. H. Osborne. Many were buried where they fell, therefore the whole battlefield is a hero's cemetery, sacred to the memory of courageous men. Patriot blood shed at Eutaw Springs was certainly not shed in vain. This last major battle in South Carolina completely broke the British hold in the South and, more important, denied needed aid to the North. Only six weeks later, Lord Cornwallis succumbed to General George Washington at Yorktown, and American independence was assured.


According to Benson J. Jossing in his Pictorial Field-Book of the Revolution - the Patriots lost 152 killed, 424 wounded, and 40 missing; the British lost 85 killed, 72 wounded, and 500 captured as prisoners.

Known Patriot Participants

Known British/Loyalist Participants

Major General Nathanael Greene - Commanding Officer

Major Edmund Hyrne - Aide-de-Camp to Greene

Continental Army led by Brigadier General Jethro Sumner (NC) in the following units:

MD Continental Brigade led by Col. Otho Williams with 400 men in two regiments:

MD 1st Regiment led by Lt. Col. John Eager Howard with the following six (6) known companies, led by:
- Capt. John Sprigg Belt
- Capt. Horatio Claggett
- Capt. Edward Edgerly
- Capt. Thomas Brogden Hogou
- Capt. Edward Oldham - MD Light Company
- Capt. Robert Kirkwood - DE Company

MD 2nd Regiment led by Major Henry Hardman with the following five (5) known companies, led by:
- Maj. Henry Dobson
- Capt. Jonathan Gibson
- Capt. John Sterret
- 1st Lt. James Ewing
- Lt. William Woolford

NC Brigade of Continentals led by Brigadier General Jethro Sumner with 350 men in four (4) regiments:

1st NC Regiment led by Lt. Col. John Baptiste Ashe with the following ten (10) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William Armstrong
- Capt. Benjamin Bailey
- Capt. Alexander Brevard
- Capt. Thomas Donoho
- Capt. Hardy Holmes (wounded)
- Capt. William Lytle
- Capt. Griffith John McRee
- Capt. James Mills
- Capt. Robert Raiford
- Capt. Anthony Sharpe

2nd NC Regiment led by Major Reading Blount with the following eight (8) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Samuel Budd (POW)
- Capt. Benjamin Carter
- Capt. Tilghman Dixon
- Capt. Thomas Evans
- Capt. William Goodman (killed)
- Capt. Christopher Goodwin (killed)
- Capt. Joshua Hadley (wounded)
- Capt. Charles Stewart (killed)

3rd NC Regiment led by Major John Armstrong with the following five (5) known companies, led by:
- Capt. John Daves
- Capt. Clement Hall
- Capt. Curtis Ivey
- Capt. Dennis Porterfield (killed)
- Capt. Edward Yarborough

4th NC Regiment led by Lt. Col. Henry "Hal" Dixon with the following two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. George Dougherty
- Capt. Joseph Thomas Rhodes

VA Brigade of Continentals led by Lt. Col. Richard Campbell with 350 men in two battalions:

VA 1st Battalion led by Major Smith Snead with the following four (4) known companies, led by:
- Capt. John Anderson
- Capt. Conway Oldham
- Capt. Thomas Bowyer
- Capt. Philip Sansum

VA 2nd Battalion detachment led by Capt. Thomas Edmunds

Lee's Legion (VA) led by Lt. Col. Henry Lee with 160 men in the following five (5) known companies:
- 1st Mounted Troop - Capt. James Armstrong
- 2nd Mounted Troop - Major Joseph Eggleston
- 3rd Mounted Troop - Capt. Ferdinand O'Neal
- 4th Dismounted Troop - Major Michael Rudolph
- 6th Dismounted Troop - Lt. Edward Manning

3rd Regiment of Continental Light Dragoons (VA) led by Lt. Col. William Washington (captured) with 80 men in three (3) known companies:
- Capt. William Barrett's 1st Troop - Lt. Philip Stuart
- 2nd Troop - Capt. William Parsons with Lt. Ambrose Gordon
- Capt. Thomas Hamilton (Guilford County, NC), with 15 men

1st Regiment of Continental Light Dragoons (VA) detachment led by Capt. John Watts with Lt. Richard Simmons

1st Continental Artillery Regiment of Virginia, 1st Battalion in two units:
- 11th Company led by Capt.-Lt. William Flemming Gaines with two 3-pounders
- 12th Company led by Capt. William Browne with two 6-pounders

All Militia units commanded by Brigadier General Francis Marion (SC):

NC State Troops and Militia, led by Col. Francois DeMalmedy.

NC Light Dragoons Regiment (State Troops) led by Col. Francois DeMalmedy*, with Major William Buford, Major Richard Goode, Major Nathan Gordon, and Major Herndon Haralson**, with the following twenty-five (25) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Samuel Ashe
- Capt. Robert Bell
- Capt. William Bostick
- Capt. William Brackin
- Capt. Mordecai Clark
- Capt. William Clark
- Capt. John Cleveland
- Capt. Robert Council
- Capt. John William Daniel
- Capt. George Dowell
- Capt. Richard Dowell
- Capt. John Duckworth
- Capt. William Fletcher
- Capt. Alexander Gordon
- Capt. Charles Gordon
- Capt. Edwin Hickman
- Capt. Baxter King
- Capt. Ewell Lampkin (some say he was too late)
- Capt. John George Lowman
- Capt. Sam McDowell
- Capt. Redwine
- Capt. Richard Saunders
- Capt. Thomas Threadgill
- Capt. Thomas Whitson
- Capt. Samuel Woods

Wake County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment led by Lt. Col. Thomas Wooten and Major Tanner Alford, with six (6) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Benjamin Blake
- Capt. Charles Edwards
- Capt. Martin Lane
- Capt. Robert Lane
- Capt. Tabb
- Capt. John Thompson

Orange County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment led by Lt. Col. Thomas Farmer, with six (6) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William Bennett (Granville County) (killed)
- Capt. John Clendenan
- Capt. Davis Gresham
- Capt. Stephen Merritt (Granville County)
- Capt. Shadrack Parish (Granville County)
- Capt. William Rogers

Rowan County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment led by Major Martin, with six (6) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Abel Armstrong
- Capt. John Brandon
- Capt. Thomas Cowan (wounded)
- Capt. Francis Cunningham
- Capt. James Lytle
- Capt. Finesse Reynolds

Lincoln County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment led by Major Francis McCorkle, with three (3) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William Armstrong
- Capt. John Culbertson
- Capt. William Moore

Caswell County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment led by Lt. Col. Archibald Murphy, with three (3) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Meshack Gentry
- Capt. Aaron Harrell
- Capt. Russell

Anson County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. John Bracken

Richmond County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. Thomas Wade

Guilford County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment led by Lt. Col. John Humphreys, with two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Daniel Gillespie
- Capt. Samuel Sharp

Randolph County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment led by Major Thomas Dougan, with two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Samuel Saxon (SC unit)
- Capt. William York

Wilkes County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment of two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. John Barton
- Capt. Wilson (killed)

Surry County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment of two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. James Gains
- Capt. Harrison Murray

Mecklenburg County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment led by Major James Rutherford (killed), with one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. John Sterns

Montgomery County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. Jarrinds

Sullivan County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. Samuel McGaughey

Washington County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. James Thompson

Duplin County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment led by Major Ivey, with one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. Thomas Coleman

Edgecombe County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment of two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Simon Lee
- Capt. John Shipp

Gates County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. Abner Perry

Tyrrell County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. Gregory

SC 1st Brigade of Militia/State Troops led by Lt. Col. William Henderson and Major John Adair (Aide-de-Camp), with 200 men in the following units:

SC 1st Regiment of State Dragoons (State Troops) led by Col. Wade Hampton and Major John Moore, with 72 men in six (6) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William Alexander
- Capt. Peter Burns
- Capt. James Giles
- Capt. John Hood
- Capt. John Reed
- Capt. James Simons

SC 2nd Regiment of State Dragoons (State Troops) led by Col. Charles S. Myddleton (wounded), with 150 men in five (5) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Godfrey Adams
- Capt. John Gray
- Capt. Francis Moore
- Capt. William Reid
- Capt. Isaac Ross

Camden District Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment led by Col. Thomas Taylor, Lt. Col. John Hunter, with five (5) known companies, led by:
- Capt. John Bell
- Capt. James Craig
- Capt. William Goodwyn
- Capt. John Graves
- Capt. Thomas Starke

Fairfield Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment led by Col. Richard Winn, with five (5) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Robert Frost
- Capt. Edward Martin
- Capt. John McCool
- Capt. Felix Warley
- Capt. John Watts

2nd Spartan Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment led by Col. Thomas Brandon, with five (5) known companies, led by:
- Capt. George Aubrey
- Capt. William Grant
- Capt. Joseph Hughes
- Capt. Robert Montgomery
- Capt. William Young

New Acquisition District Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment led by Lt. Col. John Henderson (wounded), with three (3) known companies, led by:
- Capt. James Davis
- Capt. Benjamin Haile
- Capt. James Venable

Polk's Regiment of Light Dragoons (SC State Troops) detachment led by Lt. Col. William Polk, with three (3) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Nathaniel Marshall Martin (wounded)
- Capt. Samuel Martin
- Capt. Thomas Polk (killed)

1st Spartan Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment led by Major William Smith, with two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William Dawkins
- Capt. William Harris

Hampton's Regiment of Light Dragoons (SC State Troops) detachment led by Lt. Col. Henry Hampton, with two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. John Mills
- Capt. Joseph Robins

Roebuck's Battalion of Spartan Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment of two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Peter Brooks
- Capt. George Martin

Hill's Regiment of Light Dragoons (SC State Troops) detachment of two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William McKenzie
- Capt. Thomas Shannon

Orangeburgh District Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment led by Lt. Col. Jacob Rumph, with one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. Gideon Jennings

SC 2nd Brigade of Militia/State Troops led by Brigadier General Francis Marion with 360 men in the following units:

Kershaw Regiment of Militia (SC) led by Col. James Postell, Lt. Col. Frederick Kimball, and Major Thomas Thompson, with seven (7) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William Deason
- Capt. George Dunlap
- Capt. Charles Gee (wounded)
- Capt. Benjamin May
- Capt. William Nettles
- Capt. Luke Petty
- Capt. Daniel Stewart

Berkeley County Regiment of Militia (SC) led by Col. Richard Richardson, Lt. Col. Hugh Horry (wounded), and Major John Gamble, with seven (7) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William Capers
- Capt. William Dukes
- Capt. Joseph Hill
- Capt. John Malone
- Capt. Robert McCottry
- Capt. William McCottry
- Capt. Gavin Witherspoon

Horry's Light Dragoons (SC Militia) led by Lt. Col. Peter Horry, with six (6) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Richard Gough
- Capt. Abram Lenud
- Capt. John McBride
- Capt. John Postell
- Capt. William Withers
- Capt. James Witherspoon

Cheraws District Regiment of Militia (SC) led by Col. Lemuel Benton, with five (5) known companies, led by:
- Capt. John Butler
- Capt. Gabriel Clements
- Capt. Claudius Pegues, Jr. (wounded)
- Capt. Daniel Sparks
- Capt. Jesse Steads

Maham's Light Dragoons (SC Militia) led by Lt. Col. Hezekiah Maham, with three (3) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Thomas Giles
- Capt. John Simons (maybe - if so, killed)
- Capt. Jervais Henry Stevens

Lower Craven County Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment led by Col. John Ervin, with two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William Gordon
- Capt. Samuel Tate

Upper Granville County Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. Clayburn Hinson

Kingstree Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment led by Col. Archibald McDonald and Major John James, with unknown number of men

Upper Craven County Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment led by Lt. Col. Maurice Murphy, with unknown number of men

SC 3rd Brigade of Militia/State Troops led by Brigadier General Andrew Pickens with 260 men in the following units:

Little River District Regiment of Militia (SC) led by Col. Joseph Hayes and Major Thomas Duggin, with six (6) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William Mulwee
- Capt. John Norwood
- Capt. John Rogers
- Capt. Lewis Saxon
- Capt. Samuel Sexton
- Capt. James Stark

Lower Ninety-Six District Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment led by Lt. Col. Hugh Middleton (wounded), with six (6) known companies, led by:
- Capt. James Butler, Sr.
- Capt. William Butler
- Capt. Thomas Key
- Capt. Solomon Pope
- Capt. William Robertson
- Capt. John Ryan

Upper Ninety-Six Regiment of Militia (SC) led by Col. Robert Anderson, Lt. Col. William Farr, and Major Andrew Hamilton, Sr., with five (5) known companies, led by:
- Capt. John Carter
- Capt. Thomas Ramsey
- Capt. Samuel Rosamond
- Capt. John Wallace
- Capt. Thomas Winn

Turkey Creek Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment led by Col. Edward Lacey, with four (4) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Pendleton Isbell
- Capt. John McKinney
- Capt. James Ramsey
- Capt. John Steel

Hammond's Regiment of Light Dragoons (SC State Troops) detachment led by Lt. Col. Samuel Hammond, with three (3) known companies, led by:
- Capt. George Cowan (wounded)
- Capt. Richard Johnson
- Capt. Moses Liddell

Lower District Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment led by Col. David Glynn, with unknown number of men


Capt. Robert Davis - Regiment Unknown

Capt. Uriah Goodwin (killed) - Regiment Unknown

Capt.-Lt. John Finn (killed) - Artillery, Regiment Unknown


Total Patriot Forces - 2,080
* Col. DeMalmedy inherited several companies since their leaders got sick just before the battle began.

** Maj. Herndon Haralson led three (3) companies of mounted infantry, called the "Marshall Corps." (?)

Lt. Col. Alexander Stewart - Commanding Officer

3rd Regiment of Foot (The Buffs) led by Major Thomas Dawson with 340 men

63rd Regiment of Foot detachment led by Capt. Hayes St. Ledger with 96 men

64th Regiment of Foot led by Capt. Dennis Kelly with 180 men in three known companies, led by:
- Capt. John Kennedy Strong
- Lt. James Graham
- Lt. John Holden Cowell

Light Infantry & Grenadiers led by Major John Majoribanks with 281 men in the following units:

3rd Regiment of Foot (The Buffs), Light Infantry and Grenadier Companies

19th Regiment of Foot, Light Infantry and Grenadier Companies

30th Regiment of Foot, Light Infantry and Grenadier Companies

Royal Regiment of Artillery:
- Bombardiers - 6
- Gunners - 2
- Matrosses - 12
- Additionals - 33
- 6-pounders - 3 ea.
- 4-pounder - 1 ea.
- 3-pounder - 1 ea.
- Swivel Guns - 2 ea.

Provincials led by Lt. Col. John Harris Cruger with the following units:

DeLancey's Brigade, 1st Battalion - 73 men

NJ Volunteers, 3rd Battalion led by Lt. Col. Isaac Allen with 66 men, including Capt. John Barbarie

NY Volunteers led by Major Henry Sheridan with the following known companies:
- Lt. Col. Turnbull's Company - Lt. Thomas Walker with 28 men
- Capt. William Johnston's Company - Ensign Nicholas Humphrey with 16 men
- Capt. Bernard Kane with 34 men

Coffin's Troop of Mounted Infantry led by Major John Coffin with 70 men

Provincial Light Infantry led by Major Thomas Barclay with 108 men in the following known companies:
- Loyal American Regiment, Light Infantry Company led by Capt. Morris Robinson
- King's American Regiment, Light Infantry Company led by Capt. Thomas Cornwell
- DeLancey's Brigade, 3rd Battalion, Light Infantry Company led by Capt. Gilbert Willett
- NJ Volunteers, 1st Battalion, Light Infantry Company led by Capt. James Shaw
- NJ Volunteers, 2nd Battalion, Light Infantry Company led by Capt. Norman McLeon
- NJ Volunteers, 4th Battalion, Light Infantry Company led by Capt. Jacob Van Buskirk


Total British/Loyalist Forces - 1,396
British forces detached for a rooting party:

British Regulars

Six Flank Companies of the 3rd Regiment of Foot, 19th Regiment of Foot, 30th Regiment of Foot with 62 men

3rd Regiment of Foot (The Buffs) with 78 men

63rd Regiment of Foot with 29 men

64th Regiment of Foot led by Ensign Charles Layton with 63 men

84th Regiment of Foot (Royal Highland Emigrants), 2nd Battalion (Young Royal Highlanders) with 8 men

NY Volunteers with 19 men

NJ Volunteers, 3rd Battalion with 40 men

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