The American Revolution in South Carolina

Kings Mountain

October 7, 1780


Patriot Cdr:

Col. William Campbell (VA)
Loyalist Cdr:

Major Patrick Ferguson
Killed:

28
Killed:

157
Wounded:

64
Wounded:

163
Captured:

0
Captured:

698
Old District: 

Camden District
Present County:

York County


Major Patrick Ferguson was patrolling with a force of about 125 Provincials and over 1,000 Loyalist supporters attempting to pacify the countryside. With violence and atrocities rising on both sides, 1,100 to 1,600 Patriot Militiamen, most from North Carolina but with a good number of Virginians and South Carolinians, gathered to stop Major Ferguson and his troops. When Major Ferguson became aware of the large contingent of Patriots gathering, he decided it would be prudent to move back toward Lord Cornwallis's larger army, now in Charlotte, North Carolina, a little over 40 miles to the east.

The Patriot Militia followed rapidly and, when Major Ferguson realized that they were overtaking him, he organized his defenses atop Kings Mountain, a wooded hill with a fairly clear top. On October 7, 1780, the Patriot Militia arrived at the base of the mountain and surrounded it. Soon they began scaling it on all sides. The Patriots had the advantage that the slopes of the mountain were very wooded, while the summit was not, exposing the Loyalists and Provincial troops to attack by the more-concealed Patriots. The defenders' losses quickly mounted and, when Major Ferguson was killed, the fight went out of the remaining soldiers.

Of the Loyalist and Provincial troops, 157 were killed, 163 were severely wounded and 698 were captured. The Patriot Militia lost 28 killed and 62 wounded.


One of the most important events recorded in American history was the Patriot victory gained at the battle of Kings Mountain on October 7, 1780. This battle has been the subject of many books, articles, and military analyses since the day the battle took place. Over the past 235 years, historians have provided so many diverse accounts that it gets more difficult each year to sort out all the differing and contradictory details.

Lt. General Charles, Lord Cornwallis, commander-in-chief of the British Army in the South, expecting the conquest of North Carolina to follow his recent occupation of South Carolina, spread his troops to repress Patriotic movements, and quickened Loyalist zeal on the left wing of his army, with Majpr Patrick Ferguson, an officer with great energy and courage, in command of a large force headed toward the Blue Ridge Mountains in western North Carolina. Not long after Lord Cornwallis's overwhelming victory at the battle of Camden, SC on August 16, 1780, and Lt. Colonel Banastre Tarleton's significant defeat of Col. Thomas Sumter at Fishing Creek two days later, the British and their allies were quite confident that taking North Carolina would be easier than their dominion over South Carolina and Georgia.

However, there were also setbacks for Lord Cornwallis, such as the Patriot victory at Musgrove's Mill on the same day as the Patriot defeat at Fishing Creek. With the exception of Col. Francis Marion causing many problems for the British along the Pee Dee River, most of the rest of the Patriot military was fairly-well subdued in the backcountry of South Carolina. Many key South Carolina Patriot leaders found refuge in North Carolina, including Thomas Sumter, William Hill, Edward Lacey, Thomas Brandon, Benjamin Roebuck, James Hawthorn, Samuel Hammond, John Thomas, Jr., Charles Myddleton, Henry Hampton, and Richard Winn were soon making camp near Charlotte, and several of these were seeking an audience with Governor John Rutledge, who was about 130 miles away in Hillsborough. SC Col. James Williams was already in Hillsborough meeting with North Carolina Governor Abner Nash, after escorting the prisoners captured at Musgrove's Mill on August 18th. Col. Williams asked for and received approval to recruit North Carolina Militiamen in and around Caswell County, his family's home. Several other North Carolina companies chose to join him as he went to Guilford Court House then on to Salisbury in North Carolina where he remained for almost week. While in Salisbury, Col. Williams was joined by Col. Thomas Brandon, who brought over 100 mounted men with him.

Immediately after their victory at Musgrove's Mill, the Patriots quickly dispersed, all keenly aware that Lord Cornwallis would soon be sending one of his officers after them. Col. Isaac Shelby and his men from Sullivan County and Washington County returned to their homes across the Blue Ridge Mountains. Col. Charles McDowell and his brother, Major Joseph McDowell, returned to Burke County. Col. Elijah Clarke pointed his men towards Georgia with hopes of retaking Augusta. Col. Charles McDowell sent Expresses to key officers in western North Carolina warning them to get ready - Lord Cornwallis was not about to let the Patriot victory at Musgrove's Mill to go unpunished.

As expected, Lord Cornwallis ordered Major Patrick Ferguson and his recently-created American Volunteers - about 125 Provincials hastily pulled together with officers and men from five (5) existing Provincial regiments already in South Carolina - plus many South Carolina and North Carolina Loyalists whose numbers were increasing daily, to go into western North Carolina and, if necessary, cross the Blue Ridge Mountains, in order to silence the Patriots in that region. Major Ferguson met with Lord Cornwallis in Camden, SC to discuss his orders, then he returned to his growing army and began marching towards western North Carolina. Lord Cornwallis was soon going to Charlotte, and he wanted his left (western) flank secure before leaving the relative security of South Carolina.

Major Ferguson found a small Patriot group along Cane Creek in Burke County, North Carolina on September 12th, and a brief skirmish resulted in a few casualties on both sides. The Patriots quickly decided to cross the Blue Ridge Mountains. Major Ferguson followed for a short while, then quickly realized that he was very exposed with little chance of acquiring re-inforcements, should he need them. He returned to Gilbert Town to give the Loyalist factions in western North Carolina and upper South Carolina a little more time to collect and organize their growing numbers.

In the meantime, the Patriots were very aware of what was coming. The civil and military leaders in North Carolina began to move assets all across the state, with all eyes focusing on Salisbury, the expected destination of the British and their allies. Colonels Benjamin Cleveland, John Sevier, Isaac Shelby, Charles McDowell, William Graham, Andrew Hampton, and other Patriot leaders assembled their respective Militia in western North Carolina. Col. McDowell asked for assistance from south-western Virginia, and Col. William Campbell agreed to join the North Carolinians. Expresses sent to the various South Carolina officers taking refuge in and around Charlotte were soon answered with an agreement by some of them to join forces with the North Carolinians. They too quickly sent out Expresses all over the region asking for straggling South Carolina Patriots to find them and to join up as soon as possible.

While these officers were making their plans to join forces, others were strategizing how best to defend the rest of North Carolina. Since Brigadier General Griffith Rutherford was captured by the British at the battle of Camden, SC, he was replaced with two Brigadier Generals (Pro Tempore) - Henry William Harrington and William Lee Davidson - over the Salisbury District Brigade of Militia. Brigadier General (Pro Tempore) Henry William Harrington had a small group of Patriot Militia with him patrolling between Cheraw, SC and the Lumber River in NC- he was ordered to intercept any British marching towards Cross Creek in North Carolina, a strategic Patriot depot. Brigadier General (Pro Tempore) William Lee Davidson was in and around Charlotte gathering as many men as possible with orders to keep the enemy out of Salisbury, another strategic Patriot depot. NC Continental Brigadier General Jethro Sumner had no Continentals to lead since they were all taken when Charlestown fell, but he begrudgingly accepted Governor Abner Nash's request to lead several NC Militia units that were also assembling in and around Salisbury - the expected British target. His problem was - most of these Militia units were about to go home - their time was almost up.

Col. Martin Armstrong decided to remain at home in Surry County to watch the Loyalists, while ordering Major Joseph Winston to take half of his regiment and meet up with Col. Benjamin Cleveland in Wilkes County. Col. Francis Locke chose to send Lt. Col. Matthew Brandon to find the McDowell brothers in Burke County, while he and about half of the Rowan County Regiment roamed between Brigadier General Sumner and Brigadier General (Pro Tempore) Davidson. The North Carolina Board of War met with Governor Abner Nash and South Carolina Governor John Rutledge in Hillsborough to make other key decisions. All other North Carolina Patriot Militia regiments were ordered to raise as many men as they could, and to start marching westward as fast as possible. The military stores at Salisbury were removed - some were taken to Bethabara (the Moravian town), and some was taken as far away as Guilford Court House. Very critical military items were removed from Cross Creek and taken to Wilmington and New Bern - neither town was expected to be targets of the British - but, the Patriots were smart.

Major General Horatio Gates and his dejected Continentals from Maryland, Delaware, and a few from Virginia were all in Hillsborough, North Carolina licking their wounds from their inglorious defeat at Camden, SC. Major General Gates sent out orders to anyone who might read them, including North Carolina Militia officers all across the state. From available records, it is clear that Major General Gates seldom coordinated his plans with the local civilian authorities, such as the two governors and the Board of War, all within walking distance of his headquarters. However, when it was convenient, he did discuss events with those willing to meet him in person at his location. Major General Gates mostly focused on rebuilding the morale and equipment of his Continentals, with Expresses to and from the Continental Congress in Philadelphia, and to/from all depots along the east coast that might furnish him with clothing, wagons, and arms. There was little to be had from any source south of Philadelphia.

In the middle of September, Lord Cornwallis decided it was time to go into North Carolina and began marching in that direction. He arrived in Charlotte on September 26th after being constantly harassed by Col. William Richardson Davie as he entered the fairly small town. Most of the townfolk and anything of value had already been removed to Salisbury, a little over forty (40) miles away. Everyone knew that Salisbury would be next, so most kept going.

The day before, on September 25th, a large Patriot Militia contingent gathered at Sycamore Shoals along the Holston River on the other side of the Blue Ridge Mountains in western North Carolina. Col. William Campbell of Washington County, VA brought 400 men. Lt. Col. John Sevier brought 220 men from Washington County, NC. Col. Isaac Shelby brought 220 men from Sullivan County, NC. Col. Charles McDowell was there with roughly 200 men from Burke County, Rowan County, Mecklenburg County, and Col. Andrew Hampton with his small group of Patriots from Rutherford County. The day that Lord Cornwallis arrived in Charlotte was the day this Patriot Militia started marching south-eastward in search of Major Patrick Ferguson.

The South Carolina Patriot refugees in and around Charlotte quietly moved into the neighboring counties of Rowan and Lincoln. Small groups of men from South Carolina found their leaders and all began to move slowly to join forces with other Patriot units in the general vicinity, all the while making sure that local Loyalists did not learn of their movements.

Major William Chronicle took a portion of the Lincoln County Regiment of Militia towards Charlotte to harass British foraging companies, but his numbers were too small to be a serious threat to Lord Cornwallis. When Chronicle learned of the plan to go after Major Patrick Ferguson, he turned his men westward and they began looking for other Patriots who were doing the same; it was not long before he found his superior, Col. William Graham already gathering more men, almost all with horses.

Col. James Williams and Col. Thomas Brandon of South Carolina left Salisbury on September 28th. On October 1st, Col. Edward Lacey and Col. William Hill joined Col. James Williams at Tuckasegee Ford. Lt. Col. Robert Anderson, Col. Benjamin Roebuck, and Maj. Samuel Hammond found Col. Williams at Beattie's Ford on October 2nd. The combined South Carolinian contingent included over 650 men, almost all mounted. That night, Col. William Graham arrived with Major William Chronicle and his men, bringing a total of over 160 more mounted men from Lincoln County.

Major Joseph Winston and a good number of men from Surry County joined forces with Col. Benjamin Cleveland and his Wilkes County Regiment of Militia on September 10th, and this force (some say nearly 800 men, mostly mounted) made their way southward - first to Fort Defiance then to Grider's Fort. Some sources assert that they met the "mountain men" at Quaker Meadows on September 30th, while other sources assert that they joined the "mountain men" at Burke Court House on October 2nd. This group of Virginians and North Carolinians made it to Gilbert Town on October 4th, and it was here that they decided to send Col. Charles McDowell with a letter to Major General Horatio Gates - asking him to send a general officer to come lead this group. McDowell was the most senior Colonel and a fine man, but he was not known for his military acumen. Soon after his departure, the Patriots elected Col. William Campbell of Virginia as their leader. According to all major sources, Major Joseph McDowell took over the Militia units previously led by his brother. It is this Author's "opinion" that Col. Andrew Hampton took command of the units associated with the McDowells, since he was now the ranking officer - but - there is absolutely no proof of this. It just makes sense. A full Colonel, even of a smaller regiment, clearly out-ranked a Major. Oh well.

On October 6th, all Patriots gathered at the Cowpens in northern South Carolina. Major William Candler brought roughly 30 men of Col. Elijah Clarke's Georgia regiment. The officers gathered and traded what little intelligence each of them had about Major Patrick Ferguson and his army. Col. James Williams brought forth Joseph Kerr, a spy under Lt. Col. James Steen, who had actually gone into Major Ferguson's camp the night before and knew the exact layout of the Provincials and Loyalists positions on top of Kings Mountain. It was quickly decided to leave the infantry behind and for all men with good horses to immediately ride - all night if necessary - to catch the enemy unprepared on top of Kings Mountain. Sadly, it rained all night and well into the next day, with the sun poking out soon after their arrival at their destination.

The Patriot army that arrived just west of Kings Mountain shortly after noon on Saturday, October 7th, was organized into four columns:

The left wing was led by Col. Benjamin Cleveland, with 105 known companies, including 18 companies under Lt. Col. Frederick Hambright, 20 companies from Wilkes County under Col. Cleveland, 19 companies under Col. James Williams, 12 companies under Col. Thomas Brandon, 7 companies under Col. Samuel Watson, 13 companies under Col. Edward Lacey, 5 companies under Lt. Col. James Hawthorn, 8 companies under Col. Benjamin Roebuck, and 3 companies under Lt. Col. Robert Anderson.

The left-center column was led by Col. Isaac Shelby, with 15 companies from Sullivan County, and 6 companies under Major William Candler of Georgia.

The right-center column was led by Lt. Colonel John Sevier with 26 companies from Washington County, NC.

The right wing was led by Col. William Campbell, with 82 known companies, including 14 companies under Major Joseph Winston, 21 companies under Major Joseph McDowell, 14 companies under Col. Andrew Hampton, 13 companies under Lt. Col. Matthew Brandon, 19 companies from Washington County, VA, plus one company of riflemen under Col. William Bowyer, also of Virginia.

Due to numerous inconsistencies in the various accounts, the column and wing described directly above under Col. Campbell and Lt. Col. Sevier may be exactly opposite - Campbell may have led the right-center column and Sevier may have led the right wing. Based on all available evidence, this Author leans toward the first account above.

What most historians seem to conveniently overlook is the glaring fact that all officers had decent horses, so at the battle of Kings Mountain, the Patriot army was made up of more officers than at a typical battle. Some companies were led by Lieutenants and Majors, but as usual, most were led by Captains. However, the Patriot companies averaged only five (5) men. A few had no men, while a few had as many as twenty-five (25) or more. When the Patriots marched their columns around Kings Mountain, men were re-assigned where needed, and some men ended up serving under officers that they were not familiar with. Most officers at that time knew that this caused problems, so this was managed fairly judiciously. Seldom were North Carolinians assigned to serve under officers from South Carolina or Virginia, and vice versa - except for the North Carolina company commanders and their men officially assigned to South Carolina Col. James Williams. There were a few other exceptions, but only when Captains brought their entire companies with them and joined other Colonels they had served with before. Since many officers on the western side of the Blue Ridge Mountains knew the nearby leaders so well, there was not a big problem exchanging men among Sullivan County and Washington County in North Carolina and their neighbors in Washington County, Virginia. Many officers who started out as Virginians learned in 1779 that they actually lived in North Carolina. Quite a few retained their commissions from Virginia, yet were more than willing to serve under Shelby or Sevier, both from North Carolina. Similarly, many North Carolina Captains had no problems serving under neighboring Virginia officers such as Col. William Campbell.

Most accounts assert that all Patriots dismounted about a half-mile from their destination and began forming their columns/wings long before reaching the battlefield. Other accounts assert that most men dismounted just west of the mountain (as shown below). And even other accounts insist that many of the field officers (majors, lieutenant colonels, and colonels) remained on their steeds until the last minute as they were going up the slopes. Whatever the case, the actual battle did not start until around 3 o'clock p.m. So, if the Patriots arrived shortly after noon, it took them quite some time to get their troops organized and deployed around the enemy.

Some historians assert that Col. Edward Lacey was given the honor of the first assault on the enemy, and that he handled it quite well. Most sources, however, assert that Col. William Campbell launched his initial attack - early - even before the rest of the Patriots could get into position around the mountain. Col. Isaac Shelby attacked soon thereafter on the opposite side of the mountain. Both were severely repulsed, but neither had serious losses. Col. Campbell was repulsed a second time, but his men were steadfast and made it to the top of Kings Mountain on their third attack. By then, the remainder of the Patriot army had made it to their designated positions around the mountain and were soon making their way up the slopes and pouring a galling fire into the exposed enemy's ranks.

Major Patrick Ferguson made a daring attempt to break through with sword in hand atop his horse. He rallied his Provincials several times, and most of the Loyalists acquitted themselves fairly well. A few broke through the Patriot lines and made their escape to live and fight another day. But, over 150 fell before an hour had passed. Ferguson was slain and the battle was soon over. 163 Provincials and Loyalists were wounded, and almost seven hundred were taken prisoner.

The Patriots had approximately 28 killed and 64 wounded. Interestingly, there were three (3) known ex-Continental officers and only a handful of ex-Continental "rank and file" soldiers at this engagement on the Patriot side. Additionally, Major Patrick Ferguson was the only ex-British Regular on the battlefield; all of his officers and men were "Provincials" from up north, or Loyalists from South Carolina and North Carolina (with maybe one or two from Georgia).

Soon after the battle of Kings Mountain, nine (9) Loyalists were hanged. One other was slated to be hanged, but he managed to escape.

This battle was truly one of the pivotal turning points of the war. It prompted Lord Cornwallis to leave Charlotte and return to South Carolina. This "win" offered the Patriots an opportunity to regroup and to reorganize as the Southern Continental Line was transferred from Major General Horatio Gates to Major General Nathanael Greene in early December. The battle of Guilford Court House was fought three months thereafter, where the British army was damaged considerably, and Lord Cornwallis decided to leave the Carolinas for good. He surrendered to General George Washington at Yorktown, Virginia on October 19, 1781 - a little more than one year after the battle of Kings Mountain.


Based upon analysis of hundreds of Federal Pension Applications (FPAs), this is the "most probable" deployment of Patriot troops at the beginning of the battle of Kings Mountain. Contrary to early historians assertions, many more Patriot units participated than previously documented. Many contemporaries ask "how did Ferguson lose since he had the high ground." It is this Author's "opinion" that:

A) The Patriots had many more men than early historians asserted, with a much greater numerical advantage.
B) From many sources at many engagments, it appears that "shooting downhill" was less accurate, and most men overshot their targets.
C) With the rain over and the sun now out, the Provincials/Loyalists were "silhouetted" above the Patriots, offering clearer targets.
D) With a higher percentage of officers than normal, the Patriots brought superior numbers of marksmen than the enemy had.


Click Here for a comprehensive analysis of the many disparate accounts of this famous battle, clearly showing many different views on the battle.

Click Here for this Author's detailed findings on the Patriot military organization, troop movements, and deployment at the battle of Kings Mountain.

Click Here for this Author's detailed findings on the Loyalist military organization and all known officers and men at the battle of Kings Mountain.

Known Patriot Participants

Known British/Loyalist Participants

Col. William Campbell (VA) - Commanding Officer

Washington County Militia (VA) led by Col. William Campbell, Major William Edmondson, and Adjutant John Reid, with nineteen (19) known companies, led by:
- Capt. David Beattie
- Capt. William Bowen's (sick) Company led by 1st Lt. Reese Bowen (killed)
- Capt. David Campbell
- Capt. John Campbell
- Capt. Andrew Colville
- Capt. Robert Craig
- Capt. William Dougherty
- Capt. James Dysart
- Capt. John Edmondson
- Capt. Robert Edmondson, Sr.
- Capt. William Edmondson
- Capt. John Hays (from Surry County, NC)
- Capt. Robert Kennedy
- Capt. William Love
- Lt. Thomas McCullough
- Capt. Samuel McCutcheon (Augusta County, VA)
- Capt. James Montgomery (Montgomery Co., VA)
- Capt. William Neal's Company led by 1st Lt. William Russell, Jr. (Neal was either sick or lost his horse)
- Capt. Joshua Nichols (from Rowan County, NC)

Rockbridge (VA) Rifles - Col. William Bowyer

Wilkes County Regiment of Militia (NC), led by Col. Benjamin Cleveland, Lt. Col. William Shepherd, and Major Joseph Harden, with the following twenty (20) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Richard Allen
- Capt. Daniel Bailey
- Capt. John Barton
- Capt. Thomas Biecknell (mortally wounded)
- Capt. John Brown
- Capt. John Cleveland
- Capt. Robert Cleveland
- Capt. Abraham DeMoss
- Capt. Jesse Hardin Franklin
- Lt. Martin Gambill (acting as Captain on behalf of Capt. William Nall who was sick)(wounded)
- Capt. Charles Gordon (wounded)
- Capt. Moses Guest
- Capt. Benjamin Herndon - with 60 men
- Capt. William Jackson
- Capt. John Kees
- Capt. William Lenoir (wounded) - with 6 men
- Capt. John Morgan
- Capt. Bethuel Riggs
- Capt. Thurman
- Capt. Walton

Surry County Regiment of Militia (NC), led by Major Joseph Winston, Major Micajah Lewis (wounded), and Major Edward Lovell with fourteen (14) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Joseph Cloud (aka Cloyd)
- Capt. James Giddings
- Capt. William Thrift Hughlett
- Capt. Samuel Johnson
- Capt. Joel Lewis (wounded)
- Capt. William Terrell Lewis
- Capt. Salathiel Martin
- Capt. Sam McDowell
- Capt. William Meredith
- Capt. Harrison Murray
- Capt. Joseph Phillips
- Capt. James Shepherd
- Capt. Henry Smith
- Capt. Minor Smith

Rutherford County Regiment of Militia (NC), led by Col. Andrew Hampton, Major James Gray, Major James Porter (wounded), and Major Robert Porter, with fourteen (14) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Adam Hampton
- Capt. Benjamin Harden
- Capt. George Ledbetter
- Capt. John McClain
- Capt. John McClure
- Capt. James McElhaney
- Capt. Ephraim McLean
- Capt. James Miller
- Capt. George Paris
- Capt. William Porter
- Capt. Thomas Price
- Capt. Moses Shelby
- Capt. Richard Singleton
- Capt. James Withrow

Burke County Regiment of Militia (NC), led by Major Joseph McDowell and Major George Wilfong, with twenty-one (21) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Robert Ballew
- Capt. Jonathan Camp (or Kemp)
- Capt. Edmund Fear
- Capt. John Harden
- Capt. Thomas Hemphill
- Capt. John Holmes
- Capt. Alexander Irvin (aka Erwin, Irwin)
- Capt. Thomas Kennedy
- Capt. Thomas Lytle
- Capt. Joseph McDowell
- Capt. Samuel Miller
- Capt. Robert Patton
- Capt. Adam Reep
- Capt. John Russell
- Capt. John Sigman
- Capt. Daniel Smith
- Capt. John Sorrel
- Capt. David Vance
- Capt. Patrick Watson
- Capt. Joseph White
- Capt. Samuel Woods

Lincoln County Regiment Militia (NC), led Lt. Col. Frederick Hambright, Major John Barber, Major William Chronicle (killed), Major Joseph Dickson, Major Francis McCorkle, and Maor Joseph White (from Burke County) (Col. William Graham went home sick just before this battle - some say he returned and was in the battle at the very end), with eighteen (18) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William Armstrong
- Capt. James Baird
- Capt. John Baldridge
- Capt. Samuel Caldwell
- Capt. John Carruth
- Capt. John Philip Dellinger
- Capt. Samuel Espey (wounded)
- Capt. John Hardin Hambright
- Capt. Malcolm Henry
- Capt. James Johnson
- Capt. Thomas Lofton
- Capt. Samuel Martin
- Capt. Charles Mattocks
- Capt. John Mattocks (killed)
- Capt. John Moore
- Capt. William Moore
- Capt. William Sherrill
- Capt. John Weir

Sullivan County Regiment of Militia (NC), led by Col. Isaac Shelby and Major Evan Shelby, Jr., with sixteen (16) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Thomas Caldwell
- Capt. Moses Cavett
- Capt. Gilbert Christian
- Capt. James Duff (from Lincoln County)
- Capt. James Elliott
- Capt. William Johnston (from Lincoln County)
- Capt. John Martin (from Surry County)
- Capt. George Maxwell
- Capt. John Pemberton
- Capt. George Rutledge
- Capt. John Sawyer
- Capt. George Taylor
- Capt. Roger Topp
- Capt. Thomas Wallace
- Capt. David Webb
- Capt. Jonathan Webb

Washington County Regiment of Militia (NC) led by Lt. Col. John Sevier, Lt. Col. John Lewis, Lt. Col. Charles Robertson, Major Isaac Lane, Major Benjamin Sharp, Major Jonathan Tipton, and Major Jesse Walton, with twenty-six (26) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Jesse Bean
- Capt. William Bean (Rifle Company)
- Capt. Jacob Brown
- Capt. Joel Callahan
- Capt. Benjamin Clark
- Capt. William Cox (wounded)
- Capt. James Crabtree
- Capt. Finley
- Capt. Ning Hawkins (probable)
- Capt. Joseph Lusk (Rifle Company)
- Capt. Alexander Moore
- Capt. George North
- Capt. John Patterson
- Capt. James Pearce
- Capt. Thomas Preston (Rifle Company)
- Capt. George Russell
- Capt. Robert Sevier (mortally wounded)
- Capt. Valentine Sevier, Jr.
- Capt. James Stinson
- Capt. Christopher Taylor
- Capt. Waring
- Capt. Samuel Wear
- Capt. Samuel Williams
- Capt. James Wilson
- Capt. Elijah Witt (probable)
- Capt. Young

Rowan County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment, led by Lt. Col. Matthew Brandon and Lt. Col. John Hampton, with seven (7) known companies, led by:
- Capt. John Brandon
- Capt. Thomas Cowan
- Capt. John Dickey
- Capt. James Houston (wounded)
- Capt. Peter Mull
- Capt. Richard Simmons
- Capt. Benjamin Smith

Mecklenburg County Regiment of Militia (NC) (probably attached to Lt. Col. Matthew Brandon above) detachment of six (6) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Conrad Hise
- Capt. James Ligert (aka Tigert)
- Capt. Magrath
- Capt. James Reese
- Capt. Thomas Shelby
- Capt. Zaccheus Wilson

Chatham County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment (either attached to Col. Benjamin Cleveland or Col. James Williams) of three (3) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William Gholson
- Capt. William Griffin
- Capt. John Hudgins

Guilford County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment of one (1) known company (attached to Col., James Williams), led by:
- Capt. Hugh Fabush

Granville County Regiment of Militia (NC) detachment of one (1) known company (attached to Col. James Williams), led by:
- Capt. William Bennett

Little River District Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment, led by Col. James Williams (killed), Lt. Col. Joseph Hayes, Major George Anderson (wounded), and Major John Moore, with thirteen (13) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Mordecai Clark (Burke County, NC)
- Capt. Samuel Culbertson
- Capt. James Dillard
- Capt. John Douglas (Caswell County, NC)
- Capt. Thomas Duggin
- Capt. Samuel Ewing
- Capt. William Graham (Lincoln County, NC)
- Capt. Pendleton Isbell (Wilkes County, NC)
- Capt. John Jones
- Capt. John McMullen (Caswell County, NC)
- Capt. John Smith (Burke County, NC)
- Capt. Isaac White (Lincoln County, NC)
- Capt. Daniel Williams

2nd Spartan Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment, led by Col. Thomas Brandon, Lt. Col. James Steen, Major John Moore, and Major Thomas Young, with twelve (12) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Gabriel Brown
- Capt. Daniel Duff
- Capt. William Grant (most likely killed at KM)
- Capt. Benjamin Jolly
- Capt. John McCool
- Capt. John Putman
- Capt. Moses White
- Capt. William Young
- Capt. John Boyer (detached from 1st Spartan)
- Capt. John Collins (detached from 1st Spartan)
- Capt. William Smith (detached from 1st Spartan)
- Capt. William Taylor (detached from 1st Spartan)

Roebuck's Battalion of Spartan Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment, led by Col. Benjamin Roebuck, with eight (8) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Andrew Barry
- Capt. Ambrose Finnel
- Capt. Vardry McBee
- Capt. Major Parson
- Capt. George Roebuck
- Capt. James Smith
- Capt. Robert Thomas
- Capt. Moses Wood

New Acquisition District Regiment of Militia (SC), led by Col. Samuel Watson, Lt. Col. Andrew Love (possibly wounded), and Major John Wallace, with seven (7) known companies, led by:
- Capt. John Cunningham
- Capt. Robert Hanna
- Capt. John Hawthorn
- Capt. John Henderson
- Capt. Joseph Howe
- Capt. James Meek
- Capt. Joseph Smith

Turkey Creek Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment, led by Col. Edward Lacey, Lt. Col. John Nixon, Major John Adair, and Adjutant John Miller, with seven (7) known companies, led by:
- Capt. James Johnson
- Capt. John Mills
- Capt. John Moffett
- Capt. James Ramsey
- Capt. John Steel (aka Steele)
- Capt. James Syles
- Capt. John Thompson

Hill's Regiment of Light Dragoons (SC) detachment, led by Lt. Col. James Hawthorn, and Major Samuel Tate (Col. William Hill remained at the Cowpens since he was sick), with five (5) known companies led by:
- Capt. Jacob Barnett
- Capt. James Giles
- Capt. John Hollis
- Capt. John Kincaid
- Capt. William McKenzie

Fairfield Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment, with three (3) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Samuel Lacey
- Capt. Edward Martin
- Capt. John Turner

Camden District Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment of three (3) known companies, led by:
- Capt. James Coiel
- Capt. William Goodwyn
- Capt. John Weathers

Upper Ninety-Six District Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment, led by Lt. Col. Robert Anderson, with three (3) known companies, led by:
- Capt. John Irwin
- Capt. Samuel Kerr
- Capt. Thomas Winn

Lower District Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment of one (1) known company, led by:
- Capt. John Walters

Lower Ninety-Six District Regiment of Militia (SC) detachment, led by Maj. Samuel Hammond with unknown number of men (Maj. Samuel Hammond probably served on the staff of Col. James Williams and had no men directly under him).

Clarke's Brigade of Militia (GA) led by Major William Candler and Major John Cunningham, with 30 men in six (6) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Patrick Carr
- Capt. John Clark
- Capt. Josiah Dunn
- Capt. William Hammett
- Capt. Richard Heard
- Capt. Stephen Johnson


Total Patriot Forces - 1,100 to 1,600
[This Author leans toward the latter]

Major Patrick Ferguson - Commanding Officer (killed)

American Volunteers (Provincials) led by Major Patrick Ferguson, with 103 men, in five (5) companies, led by:
- Capt. Abraham DePeyster (King's American Regiment)
- Capt. Patrick Campbell (NJ Volunteers)
- Capt. Joseph Crowell (NJ Volunteers)
- Capt. Samuel Ryerson (NJ Volunteers)
- Capt. John Taylor (NJ Volunteers)

Including men from the Loyal American Regiment, Prince of Wales American Regiment King's (Carolina) Rangers Regiment.

Old Tryon County Loyalist Militia (NC) led by Col. Ambrose Mills and Major William Mills with two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Jonas Bradford
- Capt. William Green

Burke County Loyalist Militia (NC) led by Col. Vezey Husbands (killed), with unknown number of men.

Rutherford County Loyalist Militia (NC) led by "Unknown," with four (4) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Aaron Biggerstaff
- Capt. James Chitwood
- Capt. Walter Gilkey
- Capt. Grymes

Fair Forest Regiment of Loyalist Militia (SC) led by Major Daniel Plummer, with eleven (11) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William Bogin
- Capt. James Campbell
- Capt. Philip Coleman
- Capt. William Gist
- Capt. Shadrack Lantrey
- Capt. William Lee
- Capt. Elisha Robinson
- Capt. James Shearer
- Capt. James Vernon
- Capt. Robert Whitley
- Capt. Robert Wilson

Spartan Regiment of Loyalist Militia (SC) led by "Unknown," with eleven (11) known companies, led by:
- Capt. John Anderson
- Capt. William Duman (probably same man as below)
- Capt. William Duncan
- Capt. James Gibbs
- Capt. Isaac Gray
- Capt. Nicholas Hawley
- Lt. Richard Mays
- Capt. Patrick Moore
- Capt. James Robins
- Capt. Benjamin Wofford
- Capt. William Young

Little River Regiment of Loyalist Militia (SC) detachment led by Major Patrick Cunningham, with eight (8) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Andrew Cunningham
- Capt. William Cunningham
- Capt. John Dalrymple
- Capt. William Helms
- Capt. William Hendricks
- Capt. Christopher Neeley
- Capt. William Payne
- Capt. Joseph Person

Long Cane Regiment of Loyalist Militia (SC) detachment led by "Unknown," with two (2) known companies, led by:
- Capt. David Larimore
- Capt. George Long

Steven's Creek Regiment of Loyalist Militia (SC) led by "Unknown", with eight (8) known companies, led by:
- Capt. Robert Anderson
- Capt. Bailey Cheney
- Capt. John Cotton
- Capt. William Kirkland
- Capt. Denas Nowland
- Capt. Henry Rudolph
- Capt. Thomas Whitehead
- Capt. Hezekiah Williams

Dutch Fork Regiment of Loyalist Militia (SC) led by "Unknown," with three (3) known companies, led by:
- Capt. William Ballentine
- Capt. David Reese
- Capt. Humphrey Williamson

Wagoners - 10


Total Provincial / Loyalist Forces - 885 to 1,282

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© 2015 - J.D. Lewis - PO Box 1188 - Little River, SC 29566 - All Rights Reserved