The American Revolution in South Carolina

Sandy Run Creek

July 1781


Patriot Cdr:

Major Jolly
Loyalist Cdr:

Unknown
Killed:

0
Killed:

0
Wounded:

0
Wounded:

0
Captured:

0
Captured:

1
Old District: 

Ninety-Six District
Present County:

Newberry County

aka Sandy River.


Skirmish, Major Jolly (2nd Spartan Regiment of Militia) vs. unnamed Loyalists.
Thomas Young wrote that after the siege of Ninety-Six he returned to his "old neighborhood, and was engaged in various scouting expeditions." On a scouting mission to Mud Lick with Col. Thomas Brandon he spotted two spies and pursued them.

Col. Brandon sent Major Jolly to seize a ford on their flank, so that any Loyalists would not flank them. Young saw his Loyalist cousin William Young on the other side of the river. William:

"Hailed us and inquired who commanded. A good deal was said to keep us engaged. Young waved his sword to me several times and holloed to me to go away; a moment after we were fired upon by a party who crept up the creek through the bushes. A shot went under Jolly’s horse’s belly, and another shaved my horse’s forelegs. We returned the fire, but did no damage, save a putting a ball through Young’s horse’s nose. We then retreated, under the hope that they would pursue us, but they did not."

On a different scouting mission Thomas Young was riding with Colonels Brandon, Casey, Hughes, and Major Jolly. They had learned of a band of Loyalists who were hiding in a dense thicket on "Sandy River" and the Loyalists were supposed to have a "great deal of plunder." The Patriots rode to Sandy Run Creek early in the morning and attacked the Loyalist hideout.

Thomas Young wrote:

"In the fight I took a little fellow, by the name of Tom Moore, prisoner. I ran him for some distance, shot at him, and broke his arm. – when I took him back Tom Salter wanted to kill him, because Moore had once had him prisoner, and would in all probability have killed him, if he had not escaped. I cocked my gun and told them no! He was my man, and I would shoot the first one who harmed him.

"During this skirmish I witnessed rather an amusing scene between Col. Hughes and a Tory. Hughes had dismounted to get a chance to shoot at some fellow through the bushes, when a Tory sprang upon his horse and dashed away – Hughes discovered it in time, fired, and put a ball through the hind tree of the saddle and the fellow’s thigh. The Tory fell and Hughes got his horse. In this excursion we got a great deal of plunder, which had been concealed by the Tories."


At this point in time, there were two known Major Jolly's: Benjamin and Joseph. Both in the 2nd Spartan District Regiment of Militia under Col. Thomas Brandon.


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