The American Revolution in South Carolina

 

The State House
 

April 21-22, 1775


Patriot Cdr:

Unknown
British Cdr:

None
Killed:

0
Killed:

0
Wounded:

0
Wounded:

0
Captured:

0
Captured:

0
Old District: 

Charles Town District
Present County:

Charleston County

Having resolved on rebellion, the people of Charlestown were not afraid to commit acts of legal treason. They justly considered that "all statutes of allegiance were repealed on the plains of Lexington, and the laws of self-preservation left to operate in full force." They accordingly concerted a plan to secure the arms and ammunition in the city, and on the night of the 21st of April they seized upon all the munitions of war they could find. This was the first overt act of resistance, and at that hour began the Revolution, in earnest, in South Carolina.


In one of the first acts of the Revolution, the Secret Committee on the night of April 21, 1775 broke into the magazines at Hobcaw and at Robert Cochran's on Charlestown Neck, as well as into the Armory in the upper part of the State House and seized arms and ammunition. John Drayton, "Memoirs of the American Revolution," (2 Vols. Charleston SC, 1821), pages 222-224.
Thomas Moultrie wrote, "A few gentlemen went to Capt. Cochran (the King's store-keeper) and demanded the keys of him: he said 'He could give them up, neither could he hinder them from breaking open the doors'; this hint was enough; there was no time for hesitation; and that night a number of gentlemen went and broke open the doors."

Eight hundred stands of small arms, two hundred cutlasses, and all the cartridge boxes were seized. The next day, the powder stores in Hobcaw Magazine were seized, 170 pounds were taken. Another 600 pounds were taken from the shipyard there. Lt. Governor William Bull offered a reward of £100 for apprehending the offenders, but they were never caught.



© 2008 - J.D. Lewis - PO Box 1188 - Little River, SC 29566 - All Rights Reserved